Resources

  • Afghanistan Update; United Kingdom

    Dear Colleagues, The developments in Afghanistan over the last few weeks have been extremely difficult to witness. We know many of you, like thousands of people around the country, have been closely involved in working to make Afghanistan a better place over the last two decades and have a deep connection with the country and its people. Yesterday’s callous attacks on innocent people outside Kabul airport brought into stark relief the fragility of the situation in Afghanistan. It was also a terrible reminder of the challenges we face both in getting people to safety now and supporting the country in the long-term. Our thoughts are with the families of all those who lost their lives, including several US service personnel and many Afghan civilians. As you know, in line with US military deadlines and our operational objectives, the UK evacuation effort at Kabul airport, Operation PITTING is concluding. We wanted to update you on the end of our current process and what follows next, including the return of nearly 1,000 HMG personnel over the coming days. We have worked at unprecedented pace to facilitate the largest and most complex evacuation in living memory. The Armed Forces, MoD, FCDO and Home Office staff have worked incredibly hard in very difficult circumstances to bring out over 13,000 people over the last two weeks. This number includes British nationals and their dependants, Afghans who worked for the UK government and military and their dependants, and other Afghans who are at particularly high risk. We have also supported our allies and partners to help their nationals to safety wherever possible. This has only been possible thanks to the extraordinary efforts of UK troops and government officials on the ground, who put themselves in harm’s way and worked around the clock to evacuate as many people as possible. We are grateful for all your efforts to direct those in need of support towards assistance. Our consular teams have been able to reach many in need thanks to your help. A whole of government effort will support and integrate our Afghan friends into UK society through this traumatic period...PLEASE CLICK ON THE ATTACHED DOCUMENT TO READ THE FULL STATEMENT.

    PDF icon 20210827 Afghanistan Update Dear Colleague letter.pdf
  • A House Divided: Can Afghan Elites resolve their differences in the pursuit of peace?

    This report examines the range of views held by key members of the Afghan political elite about future prospects for peace, how these views compare to those held by civil society and women rights activists, and how they might be consolidated into a coherent platform in order to enable a common voice in negotiations with the Taliban. The report draws on 20 qualitative, semi-structured, in-depth interviews with representative from across the political spectrum and civil society in Afghanistan (six of whom were women) carried out in Kabul between mid-December 2019 and mid-February 2020.

    PDF icon A HOUSE DIVIDED - AWEC 2020.pdf
  • The Afghan Tragedy, January 1988

    In 1988, the British & Irish Agencies Afghanistan Group (then the British Refugee Council) published one of the first reports on the situation in Afghanistan. The 'Afghan Tragedy' provides an unbiased description of the largest-scale human crisis in the world in those years. The 10 British voluntary agencies came together, under the auspices of BAAG, to raise the profiles of the millions of refugee and displaced Afghans. The agencies presented and adopted the recommendations at the end of the booklet at the 1987 International Council of Voluntary Agencies in Geneva.

    PDF icon The Afghan Tragedy, British Refugee Cuncil 1988-rotated.pdf
  • Afghanistan in January 2019; Key News

    Our monthly round-up of news in Afghanistan - January 2019.

    PDF icon Afghanistan in January 2019.pdf
  • Fragile Future: The human cost of conflict in Afghanistan

     Emmanuel Tronc and Anaide Nahikian presents 'Fragile Future: The human cost of conflict in Afghanistan', part of the Humanitarian Action at the Frontlines field analysis series. Fragile Futures examines the humanitarian, political, societal, and economic dimensions that make the protracted conflict in Afghanistan intractable and precarious for civilian populations. The report is based on field visits to numerous regions in Afghanistan in July 2018—which included interviews and consultations with a variety of actors, including political stakeholders, humanitarian agencies, and populations affected by conflict—as well as a review of recent and relevant literature.  The purpose of this analysis is to (1) provide a current assessment of the conflict, drawing from field interviews and an indepth assemblage of various reports and resources, (2) examine the interconnected and interdependent interests fueling the conflict, and (3) suggest that if these dynamics persist in the way they have for decades, recent elections and peace talks will represent yet another setback for Afghan communities and a peaceful future for the country. 

    PDF icon SSRN-id3291982.pdf
  • Returns and Displacment in Afghanistan - BAAG Policy Position Paper autumn 2018

    BAAG is pleased to present its autumn 2018 Policy Position Paper on Returns and Displacment in Afghanistan. Afghanistan has experienced unprecedented levels of returns in recent years and, compounded by exponential rises in internal displacement, the situation now constitutes a major humanitarian crisis. Through the input of several national and international organisations operating in/ on Afghanistan this paper offers an insight into the challenges facing Afghans residing in host countries and their subsequent return to Afghanistan.

    PDF icon Returns & Displacement Position Paper - Autumn 2018.pdf
  • Avoiding the resource curse: extractives, corruption, and conflict in Afghanistan

    Global Witness policy brief ahead of the Geneva Conference on Afghanistan.

    PDF icon 20181016 Policy Brief - Mining and Conflict in Afghanistan CLEAN.pdf
  • Building Resilience in Afghanistan

    PDF icon Building Resilience in Afghanistan_Geneva Conference position paper.pdf
  • Child marriage in Afghanistan: changing the narrative

    The primary objective of this report, prepared on behalf of the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan’s Ministry for Labour, Social Affairs, Martyrs and the Disabled (MoLSAMD) in collaboration with UNICEF Afghanistan, is to provide contextualised analysis on the knowledge, attitudes and practices of communities in order to inform the development of future programming to either mitigate the impacts of child marriage or prevent further engagement in child marriage across Afghanistan.

    PDF icon UNICEF-MoLSAMD-afg-report-Child-Marriage-in-Afghanistan.pdf
  • Afghanistan in May 2018

    Our round-up of the news in May 2018.

    PDF icon Afghanistan in May 18.pdf
  • Afghanistan Living Conditions Survey

    This report provides details of the sixth round of data collection since the start of this survey in 2003. 

    PDF icon Final English ALCS Highlight(1).pdf
  • Education and Anti-corruption: A Case Study

    This paper examines the possibilities for incorporating anti-corruption in educational curricula in Afghanistan, based on the assumption that there is a direct link between substantive provisions on anticorruption in educational curricula and anti-corruption awareness and practice becoming norms in Afghanistan’s social consciousness and culture.

    PDF icon 2017-04-04-Education-and-Anti-corruption-A-Case-Study.pdf
  • World Bank: Afghanistan Development Update

    Afghanistan’s security environment is continuing to deteriorate. The increased conflict appears to be holding back business and consumer confidence from recovering fully from the impact of the security transition in 2014. The annual economic growth rate is projected to reach 2.6 percent in 2017, increasing very slightly from the figure of 2.2 percent recorded in 2016. Industry is projected to grow by two percent, while services is projected to grow at 3.3 percent. Following a substantial increase last year (six percent), growth in agricultural output is expected to decelerate significantly to around 1.5 percent.

    PDF icon 121392-WP-P165541-PUBLIC-November-20-12-AM.pdf
  • DFID Afghanistan Profile: July 2017

    This report is a profile created by DFID on Afghanistan. It explores issues such as why DFID has invested in Afghanistan, what the aid expects to achieve looking ahead, and other relavant issues pertainig to DFID's work in Afghanistan.

    PDF icon Policy paper-DFID Afghanistan Profile-July 2017.pdf
  • Aid in a Conflict Zone: Can military and development objectives work together?

    This report presents the main points raised in a panel discussion which examined devolopment cooperation and civil-military relations in Afghanistan. 

    PDF icon BAAG_ConflictZone_Final.pdf

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