Resources

  • Global Witness: Afghanistan, lapis lazuli & the battle for mineral wealth, June 2016

    Global Witness's two year investigation reveals that lapiz lazuli mines in the northeastern province of Badakhshan are a major source of conflict and grievance, supplying millions of dollars of funding to armed groups, insurgents, and strongmen, and providing a tiny fraction of the benefit they should to the Afghan people.  Mining is implicated in violence from Balkh to Helmand. Nationally, it is thought to be the Taliban’s second largest source of revenue, while contributing less than 1% of state income in 2013. Armed groups made an estimated $12m from lapis in 2015.

    PDF icon GW war_in_the_treasury_mr1.pdf
  • AREU: A balancing act for extractive sector governance, May 2016

    Today, most extractive sector activities in Afghanistan are artisanal, small-, or medium-scale and up to 10,000 deposits remain out of government control. This is linked with continuing conflict and violence in the country, resulting in significant revenue losses from illegal extraction. On the other hand, this report highlights the practical challenges faced by civil society to play their role in improving transparency, accountability, and equitable sharing of the sector’s benefits include an unstable legal framework characterised by rushed development because of pressure to generate revenues internally, decreasing political will to implement the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, and variable and decreasing role of CSOs.

    PDF icon AREU A Balancing Act for Extractive Sector Governance.pdf
  • SCA: Experience on civilian-military interaction & consequences of the military intervention on aid delivery,

    Ahead of the Swedish government's evaluation of its engagement in Afghanistan, the Swedish Committee for Afghanistan conducted research into an area of particular concern for them, civil-military cooperation. This minor qualitative interview-based study aims to give input to various questions around the impact of international military presence and actions on development initiatives.

    Beyond Incidents; SCA's Experience on Civilian-Military Interaction and Consequences of Military Intervention on Aid Delivery
  • SCA: Perspective of the SCA to the Inquiry on Sweden's engagement in Afghanistan, March 2016

    As with other countries, Sweden has conducted an evaluation of its intervention in Afghanistan from the period 2001-14.  The Swedish Committee for Afghanistan provided the following report, presenting their perspective on the contributions made both by their own programmes and the state of Sweden.  The report is based on their own internal reports and minutes and external op-eds, articles and other communications. 

    Concerning the Swedish and International Operations in Afghanistan 2001–2014: An SCA Perspective
  • Report of the UN Secretary General to the Security Council, March 2016

    Deteriorating security and an increasingly vocal political opposition placed increased pressure on the Government of Afghanistan, despite steps towards a possible peace process. The announcement of 15 October 2016 for parliamentary and district council elections brought renewed demands for electoral reforms. The Afghan National Defence and Security Forces continued to face significant challenges in effectively countering the threats of insurgent groups across the country. The Government of Afghanistan took steps to further its economic reform agenda in the context of persistent slow economic growth and emigration, and began preparations for the ministerial-level development conference in Brussels.

    PDF icon sg-report-7march2016.pdf
  • Global Witness: SMAF & the extractives industries in Afghanistan, February 2016

    This briefing paper, written ahead of the Brussels Conference on Afghanistan in October 2016, highlights how mining in Afghanistan, far from being an economic lifeline for the country, is being exploited by the Taliban, strongmen and others. Global Witness and Integrity Watch Afghanistan pose various recommendations to regulate the sector, increase transparency and reduce opportunities for mining income to fuel conflict. 

    PDF icon Policy Brief - SMAF and the extractive industries in Afghanistan February 2016.pdf
  • Government of Afghanistan: State of Afghan Cities report 2015, February 2016

    The population of Afghan cities is expected to double within the next 15 years and by 2060, one in every two Afghans will be living in cities. In order to manage such a transition accurate data and information is essential.This report provides the first-ever assessment of the conditions in all of Afghanistan’s 34 Provincial Capitals, home to over 8 million people. It shows that Afghan cities are a driving force of social and economic development, state-building and peace-building, yet their full potential has been constrained by the absence of an effective urban policy and regulatory framework, insufficient and poorly coordinated investment, and weak municipal governance and land management.Volume One is a narrative report highlighting key issues including municipal governance, the urban economy, access to land and housing and the urban environment. Volume Two contains maps and data for all 34 Provincial Capitals.

    PDF icon GIROA State of Afghan Cities 2015 Volume_1.pdf, PDF icon GIROA State of Afghan Cities 2015 Volume_2.pdf
  • USIP: What can be done to revive Afghanistan's economy?, February 2016

    Reviving the Afghan economy during a time of intensifying violent conflict, declining external financial aid, and ongoing political uncertainty and dysfunction will be extremely challenging. But the country cannot wait for these entrenched problems to be addressed. While keeping expectations modest, this report proposes some targeted, near-term measures to increase confidence and stimulate the economy. 

    PDF icon USIP-What-Can-Be-Done-to-Revive-Afghanistans-Economy Feb16.pdf
  • Corruption Free Afghanistan: Break the Corruption Chains, December 2015

    Corruption Free Afghanistan makes recommendations on how to combat corruption in Afghanistan. These include administrative reforms, improvements to adequate educational opportunities for Afghans in insecure areas of the country and better oversight mechanisms in the provincial education departments. The report says the damages corruption causes to developing countries like Afghanistan is astronomical. The report notes that corruption, bribery, theft and tax evasion cost $1.26 trillion for developing countries per year. The report notes that although Afghanistan has been classified as one of the most corrupt nations in the world for many years now, the Afghan government has not done enough to counter corruption and increase the government’s legitimacy.

    PDF icon Resolution _ AntiCorruption _ English.pdf, PDF icon Resolution _ AntiCorruption _ Dari.pdf, PDF icon Resolution _ AntiCorruption _ Pashto.pdf
  • AISS: Trends of radicalisation among the ranks of the Afghan National Police, November 2015

    AISS - the Afghan Institute for Strategic Studies - has conducted this research as the first part of a series of papers on radicalisation in the Afghan National Defence & Security Forces. Radicalization is broadly defined as constraints on both the perspective of individuals and their tolerance to ideology and practices which diverge and differentiate from their own political, religious and social beliefs.The report presents interesting findings on, amongst others, motivations for joining the police force, police perceptions of the Taliban and religious extremism and acceptance of women's and human rights. 

    PDF icon AISS Trends of Radicalization among the Ranks of Afghan National Police.pdf
  • Asia Foundation: Survey of the Afghan People, November 2015

    The Asia Foundation's Survey of the Afghan People is Afghanistan’s broadest and longest-running public opinion poll. After the first full year of Afghanistan’s National Unity Government, 9,586 Afghans from all 34 provinces share what they think about corruption, security, the economy, women’s rights, the Taliban. Some key findings include that a majority (82.3%) of respondents owned one or more mobile phones in their household, up from 41.5 percent in 2007. One-fifth of respondents nationwide report having someone in their household who has access to the internet. Nationwide, 36.7% nationwide say the country is moving in the right direction, down from 54.7% in 2014. 89.9% say that corruption is a problem in their daily lives, the highest percentage reported in a decade. Since 2011 the survey has asked respondents if they would leave Afghanistan, given the opportunity: this year, 39.9% of Afghans say yes, an increase from 33.8% in 2011; 57.9% say no. 

    PDF icon TAF Survey of the Afghan People Nov. 2015.pdf
  • Bond: What Development Means to Diaspora Communities, Nov. 2015

    This report examines the relationship between Diaspora communities and INGOs. The report states that both Diaspora communities and INGOs want to create positive change in developing countries, but their priorities, strategies and ways of working differ substantively. The report also notes that given their different approaches, they often operate in parallel to each other, with few regular opportunities to interact and collaborate. Communication and engagement have to be planned endeavours that take up resources and require capacity. Diasporas tend to lack trust in INGOs and their effectiveness. Moreover, the language and images used by INGOs often lead to mistrust, frustration and a sense of disconnection. Many Diaspora communities believe that INGOs perpetuate negative stereotypes and oversimplify the serious issues that affect the lives of their families and friends in their countries of origin. The report also makes recommendations on how to improve this relationship between Diaspora communities and INGOs.                                                                                               

    PDF icon what-development-means-to-diaspora-communities-1115.pdf
  • Senior Officials Meeting: Co-Chairs Statement, September 2015

    The Second Senior Officials Meeting (SOM) was held in Kabul on 5th September 2015.  Co-chaired by the Afghan Minister of Finance and the UN Special Representative, the meeting was attended by delegations from 41 countries and 11 international organisations.  The meeting followed the London Conference on Afghanistan in December 2014 and provided a forum for discussing key development needs and plans. A new framework to replace the Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework (TMAF) was drafted in advance and discussed in the meeting - called the Self-reliance through Mutual Accountability Framework (SMAF).  This statement reflects on the SOM discussions and commitments. 

    PDF icon 20150905 Senior Officials Meeting Co-Chairs' Statement.pdf
  • Government of Afghanistan: Self-reliance through Mutual Accountability Framework, September 2015

    At the Senior Officials Meeting in Kabul on September 5th, the Afghan government and international community agreed a new partnership framework, the SMAF.  This replaces the Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework, agreed and adopted in July 2012.  The SMAF poses the activities and developments for both parties in Afghanistan's journey to stability and self-reliance. Six areas of attention are posed: 1: Improving Security and Political Stability; 2: Anti-corruption, Governance, Rule of Law, and human rights; 3: Restoring Fiscal Sustainability & Integrity of Public Finance and Commercial Banking; 4: Reforming Development Planning and Management & Ensuring Citizen’s Development Rights; 5: Private Sector Development and Inclusive growth and development; 6: Development Partnerships and Aid Effectiveness

    PDF icon SMAF MAIN with annex 3 sep 2015.pdf
  • BAAG: Aiding Fragile States, July 2015

    As part of their Media4Development programme, BAAG organised a policy-makers and development practitioners roundtable. It aimed to explore the challenges of development in Afghanistan and the relevance of the New Deal for Engagement in Fragile States framework in the country.  Moreover, it raised the question of how the development community (donors & NGOs) and the media can improve public communications about the complexities (and sometimes failures) of development in fragile states.  The report presents the main discussion points and recommendations. 

    PDF icon BAAG_RoundtableReport_WEB.pdf

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