Resources

  • AREU: Mapping village variability in Afghanistan, May 2015

    This research and policy briefing focuses on the variability of village ‘behaviour’ and whether or not this can be characterised more systematically in order to guide programming according to context and to account for villages’ development experience.  Much of the programming in Afghanistan since 2001 is designed to bring about changes in village-level government. However, it has rarely, if ever, taken into account pre-existing structures used by villages to organize and manage their affairs. Rather, it has been assumed that there is a landscape of identical villages with few legacies from the past, and that new interventions to reorder village government would simply displace what was there before.

    PDF icon AREU Mapping village variability in Afghanistan.pdf, PDF icon AREU Taking village context into account in Afghanistan.pdf
  • Mercy Corps: Youth & Consequences - Unemployment, Injustice & Violence, April 2015

    Mercy Corps' report tackles some of the most persistent assumptions driving youth programming in fragile states. Drawing on interviews and surveys with youth in Afghanistan, Colombia and Somalia, the report finds the principal drivers of political violence are rooted not in poverty, but in experiences of injustice: discrimination, corruption and abuse by security forces.  In light of these findings, many familiar approaches — vocational training programmes, for instance, and civic engagement — are unlikely, in isolation, to have much effect on stability. A new approach is required, one that tackles the sources of instability, not just the symptoms.

    PDF icon MercyCorps_YouthConsequencesReport_2015.pdf
  • AREU: The A to Z Guide to Assistance in Afghanistan 13th edition, March 2015

    AREU's annual A to Z Guide aims to 'enhance understanding of the dizzying array of actors,  structures and  government processes related to aid and reconstruction efforts in the country.'  The guide provide an extensive glossary of assistance terms, an overview of Afghanistan’s system of government, key primary documents, and an extensive contact directory that includes government agencies, NGOs, donors and international actors. The new edition offers: new entries on  research organisations and libraries; political overview of all 34 provinces presenting key figures such as seats in Parliament, number of districts and their population; an extensive contacts directory that includes government agencies, NGOs, and international agencies.

    PDF icon AREU A to Z Guide to Assistance in Afghanistan 2015.pdf
  • Centre for American Progress: Tackling Corruption in Afghanistan, March 2015

    After the insecurity problem in Afghanistan, many experts see corruption as the next biggest issue for the new Afghan government to overcome. According to this report, the two issues are interwoven.  The issue brief surveys the key factors driving corruption in Afghanistan and their harmful impact on Afghanistan’s security and economic development. It also offers a set of recommendations and tools for combating corruption that should be prioritized by Afghan officials and supported by the United States and other donors.

    PDF icon Cen American Progress Tackling AfghanistanCorruption.pdf
  • UNAMA: The Stolen Lands of Afghanistan & its People, March 2015

    The second in a series of three reports UNAMA's report focuses on how state lands are distributed. This paper is the result of a desktop review and joint research by the UNAMA Rule of Law Unit (RoL) and the Civil Affairs Unit (CAU) in seven provinces—Kabul, Nangarhar, Kunduz, Balkh, Herat, Gardez, and Kandahar.This report identifies, assesses, and compares the legal framework and existing land distribution practices, and proposes specific recommendations to address overarching challenges to this system.

    PDF icon UNAMA_State_Land_Distribution_System_March15.pdf
  • BAAG: Fulfilling Afghan Futures - civil society priorities post-2014, March 2015

    On 3rd December 2014, BAAG hosted the Ayenda Conference, the civil society associated event of the London Conference on Afghanistan. 250 attendees, including 53 Afghan civil society representatives, discussed development and rights priorities & recommendations for the new Afghan government and international donors.  This report captures the messages of that day, along with those from preliminary discussions and various position papers prepared by Afghan and international civil society. It aims to disseminate Afghan-focused development and humanitarian expertise to an international audience of practitioners, policy makers and donors and inform both future national and international policy related to Afghanistan and future civil society programming and initiatives.

    PDF icon BAAG_Ayenda Fulfilling Afghan Futures Mar15.pdf
  • AREU: Separation of Powers under the Afghan Constitution, March 2015

    As part of an AREU project to evaluate the Afghan Constitution, their latest paper examines the issue of the separation of powers under the current Constitution and finds that it suffers from flaws both on paper and in practice.Using the case study of Parliament’s no-confidence vote practices against several ministers, the paper discusses the ambiguities in the Constitution as well as the inherent weaknesses in the way each branch of government operates.This publication, through extensive literature review as well as interviews with experts, illustrates how under the current Constitution the President has significant power to enact laws and control how appointments are made to all levels of the judiciary. This has undermined both the separation and balance of power under the Constitution. The paper also points out that the judiciary has struggled to establish itself as an independent branch, both because of a weak constitutional architecture as well as a historical lack of institutional capacity within the judiciary. 

    PDF icon AREU Seperation of Powers Under the Afghan Constitution- Mar2015.pdf
  • HRW: Today we shall all die, March 2015

    Human Rights Watch's report details a culture of impunity that the group says flourished after the fall of the Taliban, driven by the desire for immediate control of security at almost any price. The report focuses on 8 commanders & officials across Afghanistan, some among the country’s most powerful men, and key allies for foreign troops. Some are accused of personally inflicting violence, others of having responsibility for militias or government forces that committed the crimes. HRW call for the Afghan government to prosecute those guilty of such crimes, and for the international community to apply pressure on this. 

    PDF icon HRW Today we shall all die Mar15.pdf
  • Mercy Corps: Does youth employment build stability?, January 2015

    Mercy Corp's INVEST programme (Introducing New Vocational Education and Skills Training) in Helmand provided a valuable opportunity to explore the economic reasons that may lead to a propensity towards political violence and insurgency.  Though not an original hypothesis of the programme, this quasi-experimental, mixed methodology impact evaluation contributes to research on the relationship between employment and stability. 

    PDF icon MercyCorps_youth employment stability Jan15.pdf
  • London Conference on Afghanistan communique, December 2014

    The official communique of the London Conference on Afghanistan (4th December 2014).  All country delegations, along with input from civil society (including BAAG and some of its members), contributed to and agreed the statements.  These included recognition of the progress made in Afghanistan since the Tokyo 2012 conference and before, the continuing development, governance and security challenges to be addressed, the Afghan government's Reform Agenda and the need for partnerships, including with Afghan and international civil society.  

    PDF icon The-London-Conference-on-Afghanistan-Communique.pdf
  • Civil society speeches from the London Conference on Afghanistan, December 2014

    The London Conference on Afghanistan was held on 3rd and 4th December.  On the 3rd BAAG hosted the Ayenda Conference: Fulfilling Afghan Futures, a half day civil society conference.  On the morning of the 4th, 10 Afghan civil society and 5 international NGO representatives met with the British Secretary of State for International Development, the CEO of Afghanistan and various other heads of country delegations for a one hour round-table.  And throughout the rest of the 4th,  59 country delegations attended the main London Conference, in which three Afghan civil society speeches were delivered.  Attached are the civil society speeches delivered at the Ayenda Conference and the London Conference.  

    PDF icon 1 - Key Note Speech in Ayenda Conference.pdf, PDF icon 2 - Closing Remarks Ayenda.pdf, PDF icon 3 - London conference speech Freshta Karimi.pdf, PDF icon 4 - London Confrence Speech Barry Salaam.pdf, PDF icon 6 - Ayenda Speech Barry Salaam.pdf, PDF icon 7 - Ayenda Speech Freshta Karimi.pdf, PDF icon 8 - LCA Women's Rights speech Arezo Qanih.pdf
  • BAAG: Synthesis of Afghan & International Civil Society Papers for The London Conference on Afghanistan, December 2014

    BAAG produced this helpful synthesis of the numerous Afghan and international civil society papers prepared ahead of the London Conference on Afghanistan.  It aims to provide a snap-shot of the common and key recommendations coming from both groups, providing a simplified background to some of the more detailed points raised in the LCA and BAAG's Ayenda Conference.  Thanks to ENNA for their contributions to this report. 

    PDF icon Synthesis Paper Combined Final Draft.pdf
  • Government of Afghanistan: Realizing Self Reliance - Commitments to Reforms & Renewed Partnership, December 2014

    President Ashraf Ghani presents his government's vision for reform and international cooperation ahead of his jointly co-hosted London Conference on Afghanistan (4th December 2014).  The Government lays out four key challenges facing Afghanistan and matches these with a series of commitments ‘intended to give credibility to the claims through immediate and near-term actions, and to trigger a longer process of reform’. 

    PDF icon REALIZING SELF-RELIANCE- FINAL Dec2.pdf
  • Samuel Hall:Social Protection System - An Afghan case study, December 2014

    UNICEF is considering the development of a social protection programme with a specific focus on children, within the already existing framework developed by the World Bank and MoLSAMD (Ministry of Labour Social Affairs, Martyrs, and Disabled). In order to support the design of this programme, and a proposed pilot, UNICEF commissioned Samuel Hall Consulting to conduct formative research in five districts to be targeted by UNICEF.  This research aims to 1. Build knowledge on child poverty and vulnerability, 2. Map existing social protection mechanisms, 3. Assess the state and vitality of zakat and awqaf institutions and 4. Develop a set of recommendations on the most appropriate modalities of interventions.

    PDF icon SH UNICEF-Social-Protection_Final.pdf
  • Development Initiatives: Afghanistan beyond 2014, Aid & the Transformation Decade, November 2014

    Afghanistan has been the focus of large international aid and security investments since the US-led military intervention of 2001. There have been many major milestones for Afghanistan in 2014, and the country is now on the cusp of what has been termed the ‘Transformation Decade’ spanning from 2015 to 2024. This period of transition brings with it uncertainty about the future, including the nature of international donor support and the ability of the Afghan state and economy to meet its financing needs.This report tracks three major areas of international spending that have a direct bearing on the daily lives of Afghan people: humanitarian, development and security spending. It also considers the domestic economic outlook and the choices donors face in recalibrating their partnerships and investments to protect and build on hard-won development and security gains made since 2001. 

    PDF icon DevelopInit Afghanistan Beyond 2104.pdf

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