Resources

  • Samuel Hall:Social Protection System - An Afghan case study, December 2014

    UNICEF is considering the development of a social protection programme with a specific focus on children, within the already existing framework developed by the World Bank and MoLSAMD (Ministry of Labour Social Affairs, Martyrs, and Disabled). In order to support the design of this programme, and a proposed pilot, UNICEF commissioned Samuel Hall Consulting to conduct formative research in five districts to be targeted by UNICEF.  This research aims to 1. Build knowledge on child poverty and vulnerability, 2. Map existing social protection mechanisms, 3. Assess the state and vitality of zakat and awqaf institutions and 4. Develop a set of recommendations on the most appropriate modalities of interventions.

    PDF icon SH UNICEF-Social-Protection_Final.pdf
  • London Conference on Afghanistan communique, December 2014

    The official communique of the London Conference on Afghanistan (4th December 2014).  All country delegations, along with input from civil society (including BAAG and some of its members), contributed to and agreed the statements.  These included recognition of the progress made in Afghanistan since the Tokyo 2012 conference and before, the continuing development, governance and security challenges to be addressed, the Afghan government's Reform Agenda and the need for partnerships, including with Afghan and international civil society.  

    PDF icon The-London-Conference-on-Afghanistan-Communique.pdf
  • Civil society speeches from the London Conference on Afghanistan, December 2014

    The London Conference on Afghanistan was held on 3rd and 4th December.  On the 3rd BAAG hosted the Ayenda Conference: Fulfilling Afghan Futures, a half day civil society conference.  On the morning of the 4th, 10 Afghan civil society and 5 international NGO representatives met with the British Secretary of State for International Development, the CEO of Afghanistan and various other heads of country delegations for a one hour round-table.  And throughout the rest of the 4th,  59 country delegations attended the main London Conference, in which three Afghan civil society speeches were delivered.  Attached are the civil society speeches delivered at the Ayenda Conference and the London Conference.  

    PDF icon 1 - Key Note Speech in Ayenda Conference.pdf, PDF icon 2 - Closing Remarks Ayenda.pdf, PDF icon 3 - London conference speech Freshta Karimi.pdf, PDF icon 4 - London Confrence Speech Barry Salaam.pdf, PDF icon 6 - Ayenda Speech Barry Salaam.pdf, PDF icon 7 - Ayenda Speech Freshta Karimi.pdf, PDF icon 8 - LCA Women's Rights speech Arezo Qanih.pdf
  • Harakat: Private sector reform priorities for London Conference, November 2014

    Harakat is an independent, non-profit grant making organisation which aims to improve Afghanistan's business environment.  In October 2014 they organised in Kabul a large-scale workshop of Afghan business men and women to consider the private sector's priority reform recommendations to the new government. 47 recommendations came out of the workshop which were refined into 11 priority requests to be tabled at the private sector event of the London Conference.  These include 'one stop shops' for business owners to manage their business administration needs, increasing the availability of financing, develop policies and frameworks for public private partnerships and develop a national railway system. 

    PDF icon Harakat-Private Sector Reform Priorities for London Conference Nov14.pdf
  • Development Initiatives: Afghanistan beyond 2014, Aid & the Transformation Decade, November 2014

    Afghanistan has been the focus of large international aid and security investments since the US-led military intervention of 2001. There have been many major milestones for Afghanistan in 2014, and the country is now on the cusp of what has been termed the ‘Transformation Decade’ spanning from 2015 to 2024. This period of transition brings with it uncertainty about the future, including the nature of international donor support and the ability of the Afghan state and economy to meet its financing needs.This report tracks three major areas of international spending that have a direct bearing on the daily lives of Afghan people: humanitarian, development and security spending. It also considers the domestic economic outlook and the choices donors face in recalibrating their partnerships and investments to protect and build on hard-won development and security gains made since 2001. 

    PDF icon DevelopInit Afghanistan Beyond 2104.pdf
  • CSJWG: Position Paper for London Conference, November 2014

    Ahead of the London Conference on Afghanistan, the Civil Society Joint Working Group (CSJWG), a membership network of local, community and grass-roots Afghan civil society organisations, prepared the paper below.  It highlights their review of the current situation, past achievements and future needs in the following thematic sections: Democratic reform; Governance, Rule of law and Human Rights; Government revenues, Budget execution and Sub-national Governance; Economic growth and Development; Continued partnership and Aid effectiveness; the Role of civil society.  

    PDF icon Civil-society-position-paper-london-conf-23Nov2014.pdf
  • Afghan CSOs: Support to Afghan Civil Society in the Decade of Transformation, November 2014

    Ahead of the London Conference on Afghanistan (4th December 2014), 22 Afghan civil society organisations (CSOs) collaborated to produce the attached briefing paper.  Amongst the numeous thematic papers produced by organisations, theirs focused more specifically on the role of civil society itself - to both support the new Afghan government in the delivery of reforms and services, but also to hold that government accountable on behalf of the Afghan people.  They present recommendations to the government and international community which could help civil society flourish and become a genuine partner in Afghanistan's future. 

    PDF icon Support to Afghan Civil Society in Decade of Transformation.pdf
  • VCA Report on Pharmaceuticals importation process, October 2014

    With no registration or monitoring of pharmaceutical companies in many Afghan provinces, and a strong trade in smuggled counterfeit drugs, many Afghans face agonising choices when they require medical treatment.  Afghanistan's Independent Joint Anti-Corruption Monitoring and Evaluation Committee prepared this Vulnerability to Corruption Assessment (VCA) which found that generally corruption in the pharmaceutical importation process is facilitated and perpetuated by a combination of high import volume and low surveillance and monitoring capacity.

    PDF icon 2014_11_19_Pharmaceutical_VCA_ENGLISH.pdf
  • Asia Foundation: Survey of the Afghan People, October 2014

    The 10th survey by The Asia Foundation was conducted between 22 June and 8 July 2014, shortly after the presidential run-off elections.  9,271 Afghans from across all provinces were interviewed, 49.9% of whom were women.  The overall mood of the country was cautious optimism, though fewer felt the country was moving in the right direction compared to 2013 (54.7% down from 57.2%).  The biggest concerns nationally were insecurity, corruption and unemployment.  65.4% reported feeling fearful for their own or their family's safety at some point, continuing an upward trend since 2006. 

    PDF icon TAF Survey of the Afghan People 2014.pdf
  • The Lancet: Afghanistan has a sizeable problem with opioid use, October 2014

    This study, conducted under the auspices of the State Department's Afghanistan National Urban Drug Use Study, surveyed 2,187 randomly selected urban households about home use of both illegal and prescription drugs. Then they compared the self-reported drug use with biological tests taken from samples of hair provided by household members.  The study findings support concerns raised that Afghanistan has a high rate of drug usage — about 5.1 percent, or 1 in 20 people. Opioids and cannabis were the most popular.  

    PDF icon Lancet Afghanistan Drugs study Oct14.pdf
  • ACBAR: Transforming development beyond Transition, October 2014

    BAAG's partner in Afghanistan, ACBAR, have produced 4 thematic and 1 summary position paper for the London Conference on Afghanistan, on 4th December.  These papers reflect the progress made since their previous papers for the Tokyo conference in 2012, and highlight the continuing needs, challenges and recommendations.  Their papers are on Women's Rights, Aid Effectiveness, Service Delivery and Governance.  

    PDF icon Transforming Development Beyond Transition in Afghanistan AID EFFECTIVENESS.pdf, PDF icon Transforming Development Beyond Transition in Afghanistan GOVERNANCE.pdf, PDF icon Transforming Development Beyond Transition in Afghanistan SERVICE.pdf, PDF icon Transforming Development Beyond Transition in Afghanistan Womens Rights.pdf, PDF icon Transforming Development Beyond Transition in Afghanistan SUMMARY.pdf
  • InterAction: Human security in Afghanistan - where do we go from here?, October 2014

    InterAction, based in Washington, D.C., is an alliance organization of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), with 180-plus members working around the world. InterAction serves as a convener, thought leader and voice of the NGO community.  Ahead of the London Conference on Afghanistan (4th December 2014), their Humanitarian Practice prepared the attached briefing paper to highlight issues of aid effectiveness and development support requiring the attention of governments and donors. 

    PDF icon InterAction Afghanistan policy paper Oct 2014 pdf (1).pdf
  • Global Witness: Letter to President of Afghanistan regarding natural resources, October 2014

    Global Witness have long campaigned for stronger governance of Afghanistan's natural resources - seen by many as a key to the country's financial development but equally posing threats to corruption and continued insecurity.  Ahead of the London Conference on Afghanistan (4th December 2014), they wrote letters to the co-hosts, President Ashraf Ghani and Prime Minister David Cameron.  These letters explain the issues that could arise from current legislation and asks for commitment to the reform of these.  

    File 20141016 Tokyo CSO letter draft to President Ghani.docx
  • ACF: Afghanistan - back to the reality of needs, September 2014

    Action Contre Faim (Action against Hunger) call for a shift in thinking by the international donors and community to address humanitarian and development financing.  Since 2012 the Afghan government took responsibility for disbursement of aid budgets - but were not supported sufficiently for doing so.  Subsequently funding decisions and mechanisms have impacted the quality and reach of aid and development programmes, to the detriment of local communities and the most vulnerable. Essential aid activities have suffered as a result of political decisions - ACF call on the Afghan government, international donors and NGOs to consider alternative policies and practices. 

    PDF icon ACF_Afghanistan_backtotherealityofneeds_sept14_reportBDef.pdf
  • Global Witness: Letter to NATO Secretary General regarding Afghanistan's natural resources governance, August 2014

    Global Witness and a coalition of Afghan and international civil society organisations, including BAAG, have written to the NATO Secretary General calling for a focus on natural resources governance in the upcoming September NATO summit.  With the international community placing high hopes on natural resources extraction to improve Afghanistan's economy, there are concerns that the current law, approved this month by President Karzai, does not go far enough to ensure accountability and transparency, and such ommissions may provide opportunities for increased insurgent activity in the sector. 

    PDF icon Global Witness CSO NATO Letter 20140821.pdf

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