Resources

  • ACBAR: Country Briefing - Aid Effectiveness, January 2014

    ACBAR (Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief & Development) present their position on the challenges to aid effectiveness as the country enters the Transition period. 

    PDF icon ACBAR aid effectiveness country briefing 2014.pdf
  • TMAF: Report of the Special Joint Coordination & Monitoring Board Meeting (Dari), January 2014

    After the Senior Officials Meeting in July 2013, there followed a JCMB meeting in January 2014 to review progress against the six areas of commitment for the Government of Afghanistan and international community outlined in the TMAF (Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework) of 2012.  This report highlights progress to date and challenges remaining.  An English version is provided in the 'Development' section. 

    PDF icon JCMB Joint Report Dari-Final Version.pdf
  • Samuel Hall: “A Study of Poverty, Food Security and Resilience in Afghan Cities, 2014

    This study was funded by the European Union and conducted by Samuel Hall, DRC (Danish Refugee Council) and PIN (People in Need). It provides new insights into the nature, level and complexity of poverty, food security and resilience issues among urban households in Afghanistan. It compares the experiences of host communities, IDPs and returnees across the five major Afghan cities and provides evidence-based recommendations for practical action and policy reform to more effectively address urban poverty.

    PDF icon SH DRC-PIN-Urban-Poverty-Report.pdf
  • Ministry of Economy: Millennium Development Goals report 2012, December 2013

    The Afghan Ministry of Economy reports on the progress of Afghanistan towards the 2015 MDGs.  Afghanistan adopted the MDGs in 2004, 5 years after their declaration. This is their 4th progress report. 

    PDF icon Afghanistan MDGs 2012 Report.pdf
  • Transparency International: Corruption Perceptions Index, December 2013

    For the second year running, Afghanistan scores joint lowest in the world in Transparency International's (TI) annual Index of corruption perception.  In their launch statement, TI commented "Despite 2013 being a year in which governments around the world passed new laws and forged fresh commitments to end corruption, people are not seeing the results of these promises."The Corruption Perceptions Index ranks countries and territories based on how corrupt their public sector is perceived to be. A country or territory’s score indicates the perceived level of public sector corruption on a scale of 0 - 100, where 0 means that a country is perceived as highly corrupt and 100 means it is perceived as very clean. A country's rank indicates its position relative to the other countries and territories included in the index.   The Technical Methodology document is attached, along with the Index results brochure. 

    PDF icon Corruption Perception Index 2013.pdf, PDF icon CPI Technical Methodology.pdf
  • Integrity Watch: On Afghanistan's Roads - Extortion & Abuse, November 2013

    Integrity Watch Afghanistan's survey on extortion and abuse against truck drivers on major highways of Afghanistan. The report considers how insecurity, police professionalism, internal and external supervision, and ethnic and regional discrimination relate to illegal road tolls and abusive behavior by the police.  Findings also show that counter-narcotics officials on the highways never provided receipts for payments, overcharging by Ministry of Transport officials was common and Ministry of Public Works officials were particularly aggressive in claiming its tolls.  Recently a centralized system of collecting taxes has been established for some of the tolls, which has been effective in reducing corruption.  Read the full report here. 

    PDF icon IWA On_afghanistans_roads_extortion.pdf
  • BAAG: Sustainable Engagement to 2014 & beyond, November 2013

    BAAG and Chatham House convened a panel of experts on Afghanistan to consider various scenarios the country may face in 2014 and beyond.  Topics included the presidential election process, improving governance, and the role of civil society.  Overall, the panel felt a middle ground, cautiously optimistic scenario was most likely, and discussions indicated the increasingly loud voice of a nation who are demanding progress from their government.  

    PDF icon BAAG Chatham House Sustainable Engagement Nov 13.pdf
  • TMAF: July 2013 Senior Officials Meeting, September 2013

    Held on 3 July 2013 in Kabul, the Senior Officials Meeting (SOM) was convened almost a year after the July 2012 Tokyo Conference, in which the Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework (TMAF) was established, to cofirm the commitments of the international community and the Government of Afghanistan in the move from Afghanistan's transition to transformation.  The SOM served as a 1 year follow-up mechanism, to review progress on the principles of the TMAF. The Meeting was co-chaired by the Ministers of Foreign Affairs and Finance and the Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary General to Afghanistan. Delegations from 40 countries and 8 international agencies in addition to Ministers and senior officials of the Afghan Government and representatives of Afghan civil society and private sector attended the SOM. The meeting revealed progress in some areas yet continued efforts and commitment required in others.   

    PDF icon SOM FINAL Report 02 July 2013.pdf
  • BAAG: Letter to Ministry of Mines, June 2013

    BAAG and 35 international and Afghan civil society organisations petitioned the Afghan Ministry of Mines to deliver on their commitments for effective oversight of the burgeoning mining sector.  The call came ahead of critical meetings in Kabul on 3rd July 2013. At the 2012 Tokyo conference, Afghanistan and its international partners agreed to develop a framework “that governs Afghanistan’s natural wealth through an accountable, efficient and transparent mechanism which builds upon and surpasses international best practices.”  The civil society organisations responded to concerns that this could be interpreted as nothing more than publishing mining revenues.A further letter was sent to the international partners party to the Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework. Read the letters in full here. 

    PDF icon Civil Society Letter to MoM June 2013.pdf, PDF icon Letter to International TMAF partners re mining June 13.pdf
  • HPG/ODI: The Search for Common Ground, April 2013

    Through a series of case studies and other exchanges, this project aims to provide contextual analysis of how civil–military coordination mechanisms have functioned in disaster and conflict contexts in Afghanistan from 2002- 2013. Of key concern is what impact civil–military coordination mechanisms have had on the efficiency or effectiveness of humanitarian response, and on outcomes for affected populations.

    PDF icon The Search for Common Ground April 2013.pdf
  • Water Governance Models in Afghanistan: Filling the Gap

    This paper examines the necessity for water governance and resource management. The author states that Afghanistan is not a 'blank slate' as the international community believes, but that it must adapt to the institutional norms already in place.

    PDF icon Water Governance Models in Afghanistan March 2013.pdf
  • UNODC: Corruption Survey, February 2013

    The United Nations says that fewer people reported paying bribes in Afghanistan in 2012, but the total cost of corruption has increased significantly.  The latest survey from the UN Office on Drugs and Crime said that in 2012, 50% of Afghan citizens paid a bribe to a public official, down from 59 per cent in 2009.  However, the report adds that both the frequency and cost of bribes have increased. The total cost of corruption, it said, had increased by 40 per cent over the past three years to reach $3.9 billion. 

    PDF icon UNODC Recent Patterns and Trends Dec. 2012.pdf
  • AREU: Land, People, and the State in Afghanistan: 2002 – 2012

    This case study documents the changes in land relations and land governance since the signing of the Bonn Agreement in December 2001. It says that the decade began and ended with rhetoric against land grabbing. However, it adds that the practice now seems "too entrenched, too tacitly supported politically, and too expedient for private wealth creation by elites, to be halted ".

    PDF icon AREU Land, People, and the State in Afghanistan 2002-2012.pdf
  • World Bank: Afghanistan in Transition: Looking Beyond 2014, May 2012

     This report explores the ramifications which transition -the withdrawal of most international troops by 2014 - will have on Afghanistan's economic and development fabric.  It points out that the decline in external assistance will have widespread repercussions for Afghanistan’s political and economic landscape well beyond 2014..

    PDF icon World Bank Afghanistan in Transition May 2012.pdf
  • ODI: Talking to the Other Side, December 2012

    The first substantive research of its kind into aid access, this report and policy brief by the Overseas Development Institute examines how aid agencies engage with the Taliban to gain access to Afghans in need of assistance. Compiled after almost 150 interviews with Afghans, aid agencies, the Taliban and diplomats, it offers a series of recommendations on humanitarian negotiations.

    PDF icon ODI Talking to the other side Full Report.pdf, PDF icon ODI Talking to the other side Policy Brief.pdf

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