Resources

  • HRW: "Stop reporting or we'll kill your family", January 2015

    Violence and threats against journalists in Afghanistan is rising, according to Human Rights Watch's report. This report documents harassment, intimidation, and attacks on journalists and the Afghan government’s failure to investigate and prosecute those responsible. The failure to protect journalistic freedom has emboldened those determined to suppress criticism of the government, the security forces, and other powerful entities in Afghan society. 

    PDF icon HRW media afghanistan_01 2015.pdf
  • HRW: World Report 2015, January 2015

    Human Rights Watch produce an annual World Report, documenting the status of human rights in various countries.  In Afghanistan The United Nations recorded a 24 percent rise in civilian casualties in the first six months of 2014 compared to 2013, most due to insurgent attacks. Intensified fighting and diminished security displaced 38,000 people from January through September 2014, bringing the total number of internally displaced people in Afghanistan to over 755,000.In addition to these conflict-related threats to civilians, other rights issues remain of serious concern to HRW: impunity of security forces, government officials and other powerful groups, attacks on journalists and freedom of speech and violence against women. 

    PDF icon HRW World Report 2015_web.pdf
  • UNOHCHR: Report of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on the situation of human rights in Afghanistan, January 2015

    The High Commissioner's annual report on Afghanistan calls for the new National Unity Government to 'consolidate and expand human rights protections'.  He raises concerns, amongst others, of the rising civilian casualties, the continued use of children in armed conflict, torture of detainees and violence against women.  He notes the internal reform efforts of the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission and calls for the government's continued support to this important institution.  

    PDF icon UNOHRC_2014 HR report.pdf
  • War Child/Children in Crisis: Are you listening?, December 2014

    The issue of child rights has not featured highly in preparations of the London Conference on Afghanistan.  Consequently, BAAG members War Child and Children in Crisis worked together to produce a short briefing paper and video presenting the needs of children and youth, as stated by these groups themselves.  The Children's Voices video can be viewed in our Media section.

    PDF icon Are you Listening_Children's Voices on Afghanistan's Future_Dec14.pdf
  • EU: Local Strategy for Human Right Defenders in Afghanistan, December 2014

    The Human Right Defenders Strategy launched in December 2014 is agreed between EU, its Member States, Canada, Norway and Switzerland to protect Afghan Human Rights Defenders and support them in their important work for the protection of human rights in Afghanistan.  "Afghanistan needs to do more to ensure human rights for all its citizens. Human Rights Defenders fight to protect these rights. The European Union therefore calls on the leaders and the government of the Afghan nation to take immediate measures to ensure that all Human Rights Defenders can work freely and without restrictions; and to instruct its police authorities and prosecutors to investigate and prosecute all threats and attacks against Human Rights Defenders". European Union Special Representative and Head of the European Union Delegation to Afghanistan, Franz-Michael Mellbin.

    PDF icon EU+ Local Strategy for Human Right Defenders in Afghanistan 2014.pdf
  • CSJWG: Position Paper for London Conference, November 2014

    Ahead of the London Conference on Afghanistan, the Civil Society Joint Working Group (CSJWG), a membership network of local, community and grass-roots Afghan civil society organisations, prepared the paper below.  It highlights their review of the current situation, past achievements and future needs in the following thematic sections: Democratic reform; Governance, Rule of law and Human Rights; Government revenues, Budget execution and Sub-national Governance; Economic growth and Development; Continued partnership and Aid effectiveness; the Role of civil society.  

    PDF icon Civil-society-position-paper-london-conf-23Nov2014.pdf
  • AIHRC: Causes & consequences of Bacha Bazi in Afghanistan, August 2014

    Bacha Bazi, a form of sexual abuse and exploitation suffered by young boys, is not explicitly outlawed as a crime.  The Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission has conducted research nationwide, interviewing 31 victims of the practice and 36 perpetrators of the abuse.  Their report provides recommendations to the Afghan government and civil society on how it must be criminalised.  This report is taken from the AIHRC website.  

    PDF icon AIHRC Causes and Consequences of Bacha Bazi in Afghanistan.pdf
  • Amnesty International: Left in the Dark, August 2014

    Thousands of Afghan civilians have been killed or injured as a result of strikes and operations by the international forces.  However, with these forces immune from Afghan legal processes, most of these incidents remain uninvestigated, let alone unpunished.  Amnesty International's report, focused primarily on air strikes and night raids conducted by US forces, documents in detail the failures of accountability for US military operations in Afghanistan. It calls on the Afghan government to ensure that accountability for unlawful civilian killings is guaranteed in any future bilateral security agreements signed with NATO and the United States.

    PDF icon Amnesty International Left in the Dark Aug14.pdf
  • UNAMA: Protecting Afghanistan's Children in Armed Conflict, May 2014

    UNAMA has collaborated with AIHRC (Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission) and Afghan religious leaders, scholars and experts to produce a booklet on the obligations of all parties to the country’s armed conflict to respect and promote the rights of children under international law and Islam.The booklet also highlights the complementarity of the teachings and fundamental tenets of Islam with international human rights and international humanitarian law. In 2013 UNAMA documented 1,694 child casualties – 545 killed and a further 1,149 injured.  Focusing on the six grave violations of child rights in armed conflict - namely the killing and maiming of children; recruitment, use and association of children with armed forces and armed groups; the abduction of children; attacks against schools and hospitals; rape and other forms of sexual violence against children, and the denial of access to humanitarian assistance - the booklet examines each violation under Sharia law, international human rights law, international humanitarian law and the national laws of Afghanistan. The booklet is aimed at becoming a resource and advocacy tool for all child protection partners and promoting dialogue on critical and sensitive issues.  The booklet is also available in Dari.  

    PDF icon CAAC and Islam_Leaflet_Final_English (for website).pdf
  • UNAMA: Protecting Afghanistan's Children in Armed Conflict, May 2014

    UNAMA has collaborated with AIHRC (Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission) and Afghan religious leaders, scholars and experts to produce a booklet on the obligations of all parties to the country’s armed conflict to respect and promote the rights of children under international law and Islam.The booklet also highlights the complementarity of the teachings and fundamental tenets of Islam with international human rights and international humanitarian law. In 2013 UNAMA documented 1,694 child casualties – 545 killed and a further 1,149 injured.  Focusing on the six grave violations of child rights in armed conflict - namely the killing and maiming of children; recruitment, use and association of children with armed forces and armed groups; the abduction of children; attacks against schools and hospitals; rape and other forms of sexual violence against children, and the denial of access to humanitarian assistance - the booklet examines each violation under Sharia law, international human rights law, international humanitarian law and the national laws of Afghanistan. The booklet is aimed at becoming a resource and advocacy tool for all child protection partners and promoting dialogue on critical and sensitive issues.  The booklet is also available in English.  

    PDF icon CAAC and Islam_Leaflet_Final_Dari.pdf
  • Afghan Journalists Safety Committee: Open Letter to President Karzai, May 2014

    Following a worrying rise in the number of attacks and intimidation against journalists, the Afghan Journalist's Safety Committee have presented the below letter and petition to President Hamid Karzai.  Given their data that 63% of attacks in the second half of 2014 were committed by government officials, their request for greater protection and improved relations between the media and government are well founded.  

    PDF icon Afghan Journalists Safety Committee openletter.pdf
  • FCO: Human Rights & Democracy 2013 report, April 2014

    In the annual report by the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, Afghanistan is one of their 28 countries of concern.  The report highlights a variety of human rights concerns within the country: freedom of expression, human rights defenders, access to justice, the death penalty, torture, protection of civilians, freedom of religion or belief, women's rights, minority rights and children's rights. 

    PDF icon FCO HR&Democracy 2013.pdf
  • UN Human Rights Council: Report of the Working Group on the UPR, April 2014

    The UN Human Rights Council reviews progress of countries in their implementation of various human rights standards.  A working group meet with their governments to pose questions and concerns raised by UN members.  In January 2014 the 2nd discussion of this Universal Periodic Review process convened and the Afghan government responded to the recommendations raised by members.  This report captures the outcomes of that discussion, in which the Afghan government accepted most recommendations, chose to debate certain others and rejected 3 - the latter being the abolition of the death penalty, abolishing the practice of prosecuting women for 'moral crimes' and ensuring non-discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity and repealing criminalisation of same-sex sexual relations. 

    PDF icon UN HR Council Report of the WG on the UPR April14.pdf
  • USIP: Youth Mobilization and Political Constraints in Afghanistan, January 2014

    In this Special Report from The United Stated Institute of Peace (USIP) - a nonpartisan organisation developing and disseminating research and analysis on international conflicts - the authors investigate youth activism in Afghanistan today.  Drawing on over 100 interviews, the report examines the role and space for youth participation in Afghan politics.  Read the report here. 

    PDF icon Youth_Mobilization_and_Political_Constraints_in_Afghanistan.pdf
  • Integrity Watch: Mobilizing Communities for Court Watch, February 2013

    Integrity Watch Afghanistan spent six months studying a community monitoring programme of court trials in Bamyan and Kapisa provinces. Its report concludes that this programme has helped to make the judicial process slightly more transparent and accountable. Overall, it found that judges became slightly more open to the idea of community involvement in overseeing trials. And it recorded a significant rise in the number of trials which monitors were allowed to attend. 

    PDF icon Mobilizing Communities for Court Watch Feb. 2013.pdf

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