Resources

  • UNAMA: Protecting Afghanistan's Children in Armed Conflict, May 2014

    UNAMA has collaborated with AIHRC (Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission) and Afghan religious leaders, scholars and experts to produce a booklet on the obligations of all parties to the country’s armed conflict to respect and promote the rights of children under international law and Islam.The booklet also highlights the complementarity of the teachings and fundamental tenets of Islam with international human rights and international humanitarian law. In 2013 UNAMA documented 1,694 child casualties – 545 killed and a further 1,149 injured.  Focusing on the six grave violations of child rights in armed conflict - namely the killing and maiming of children; recruitment, use and association of children with armed forces and armed groups; the abduction of children; attacks against schools and hospitals; rape and other forms of sexual violence against children, and the denial of access to humanitarian assistance - the booklet examines each violation under Sharia law, international human rights law, international humanitarian law and the national laws of Afghanistan. The booklet is aimed at becoming a resource and advocacy tool for all child protection partners and promoting dialogue on critical and sensitive issues.  The booklet is also available in English.  

    PDF icon CAAC and Islam_Leaflet_Final_Dari.pdf
  • Afghan Journalists Safety Committee: Open Letter to President Karzai, May 2014

    Following a worrying rise in the number of attacks and intimidation against journalists, the Afghan Journalist's Safety Committee have presented the below letter and petition to President Hamid Karzai.  Given their data that 63% of attacks in the second half of 2014 were committed by government officials, their request for greater protection and improved relations between the media and government are well founded.  

    PDF icon Afghan Journalists Safety Committee openletter.pdf
  • FCO: Human Rights & Democracy 2013 report, April 2014

    In the annual report by the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, Afghanistan is one of their 28 countries of concern.  The report highlights a variety of human rights concerns within the country: freedom of expression, human rights defenders, access to justice, the death penalty, torture, protection of civilians, freedom of religion or belief, women's rights, minority rights and children's rights. 

    PDF icon FCO HR&Democracy 2013.pdf
  • UN Human Rights Council: Report of the Working Group on the UPR, April 2014

    The UN Human Rights Council reviews progress of countries in their implementation of various human rights standards.  A working group meet with their governments to pose questions and concerns raised by UN members.  In January 2014 the 2nd discussion of this Universal Periodic Review process convened and the Afghan government responded to the recommendations raised by members.  This report captures the outcomes of that discussion, in which the Afghan government accepted most recommendations, chose to debate certain others and rejected 3 - the latter being the abolition of the death penalty, abolishing the practice of prosecuting women for 'moral crimes' and ensuring non-discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity and repealing criminalisation of same-sex sexual relations. 

    PDF icon UN HR Council Report of the WG on the UPR April14.pdf
  • USIP: Youth Mobilization and Political Constraints in Afghanistan, January 2014

    In this Special Report from The United Stated Institute of Peace (USIP) - a nonpartisan organisation developing and disseminating research and analysis on international conflicts - the authors investigate youth activism in Afghanistan today.  Drawing on over 100 interviews, the report examines the role and space for youth participation in Afghan politics.  Read the report here. 

    PDF icon Youth_Mobilization_and_Political_Constraints_in_Afghanistan.pdf
  • Integrity Watch: Mobilizing Communities for Court Watch, February 2013

    Integrity Watch Afghanistan spent six months studying a community monitoring programme of court trials in Bamyan and Kapisa provinces. Its report concludes that this programme has helped to make the judicial process slightly more transparent and accountable. Overall, it found that judges became slightly more open to the idea of community involvement in overseeing trials. And it recorded a significant rise in the number of trials which monitors were allowed to attend. 

    PDF icon Mobilizing Communities for Court Watch Feb. 2013.pdf
  • Child Soldiers International: Louder than words - An agenda for action to end state use of child soldiers, 2012

    The report “Louder than words: An agenda for action to end state use of child soldiers” was published to mark the tenth anniversary year of the entry into force of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict. It examines the record of states in protecting children from use in hostilities by their own forces and by state-allied armed groups. It finds that, while governments’ commitment to ending child soldier use is high, the gap between commitment and practice remains wide. Research for the report shows that child soldiers have been used in armed conflicts by 20 states since 2010, and that children are at risk of military use in many more.

    PDF icon CSI louderthanwordsseptember2012.pdf
  • NGOs and Humanitarian Reform: Mapping Study Afghanistan Report, May 2009

    This report highlights key challenges and dilemmas that the humanitarian community in general, and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in particular, are facing in Afghanistan today. The report concludes with two overarching recommendations. The first is that in order to enhance the perception of neutrality, independence and impartiality of their humanitarian activities, particularly in those areas of the country where working with legitimate local authorities is no longer possible, NGOs should establish a Humanitarian Consortium that would distinguish itself from other actors on the ground by a recognizable symbol (e.g. pink vehicles or a particular logo) and by a set of 3 principled, clear and transparent operational guidelines.The second relates to the urgent need to launch a communications strategy aimed at the general public and all belligerents to explain the principles, objectives and modus operandi of consortium agencies. This should include efforts to ensure that the vernacular media provide a balanced presentation of humanitarian activities, a campaign to sensitise decision-makers at the sub-national level (provincial councils, governors, leading mullahs), including efforts directed at influencing the leadership of the insurgency on humanitarian access and the rights of civilians caught up in conflict.

    PDF icon 0294-Donini-2009-NGOs-and-Humanitarian-Reform-Mapping-Study-Afghanistan-Report.pdf

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