Resources

  • Afghanistan Update; United Kingdom

    Dear Colleagues, The developments in Afghanistan over the last few weeks have been extremely difficult to witness. We know many of you, like thousands of people around the country, have been closely involved in working to make Afghanistan a better place over the last two decades and have a deep connection with the country and its people. Yesterday’s callous attacks on innocent people outside Kabul airport brought into stark relief the fragility of the situation in Afghanistan. It was also a terrible reminder of the challenges we face both in getting people to safety now and supporting the country in the long-term. Our thoughts are with the families of all those who lost their lives, including several US service personnel and many Afghan civilians. As you know, in line with US military deadlines and our operational objectives, the UK evacuation effort at Kabul airport, Operation PITTING is concluding. We wanted to update you on the end of our current process and what follows next, including the return of nearly 1,000 HMG personnel over the coming days. We have worked at unprecedented pace to facilitate the largest and most complex evacuation in living memory. The Armed Forces, MoD, FCDO and Home Office staff have worked incredibly hard in very difficult circumstances to bring out over 13,000 people over the last two weeks. This number includes British nationals and their dependants, Afghans who worked for the UK government and military and their dependants, and other Afghans who are at particularly high risk. We have also supported our allies and partners to help their nationals to safety wherever possible. This has only been possible thanks to the extraordinary efforts of UK troops and government officials on the ground, who put themselves in harm’s way and worked around the clock to evacuate as many people as possible. We are grateful for all your efforts to direct those in need of support towards assistance. Our consular teams have been able to reach many in need thanks to your help. A whole of government effort will support and integrate our Afghan friends into UK society through this traumatic period...PLEASE CLICK ON THE ATTACHED DOCUMENT TO READ THE FULL STATEMENT.

    PDF icon 20210827 Afghanistan Update Dear Colleague letter.pdf
  • Urgent Demand for Inclusion in the “Accelerated Afghan Peace Talks”

    Afghan society including civil society organisations, community leaders, religious scholars, youth, women activists and networks, victims, professional organisations, religious scholars, Tribal/Community leaders, scholars, experts, men and more, have in this historic National Peace Gathering, brought together over 1350 Afghan society representatives from every District and Province in Afghanistan and many more Afghan Diaspora have participated via a Facebook livestream.

    PDF icon Statement of National Peace Gathering-English Version.pdf
  • Beyond Kabul: Women Peace Builder's Reflection on the Peace Process and the Impact of Covid-19

    This research report was drafted by the Afghan Women’s Educational Center (AWEC), synthesizing insights from one hundred and fifty telephone interviews with women peacebuilders and negotiators from eight provinces of Afghanistan (Badakhshan, Kandahar, Herat, Helmand, Paktia, Nangarhar, Kabul, Balkh). It was conducted at a critical juncture, as the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan (GoIRA) entered into talks with the Taliban. Since the beginning of the United States talks with the Taliban, women across Afghanistan have increased their voice for women participation in peace processes as equal citizen of the country in welcoming the possibility of peace, while raising concerns that their rights may be compromised if the process is conducted hastily and they are not substantially represented. This policy brief aims to ensure that women’s voices are heard in upcoming political dialogues and during the intra-Afghan peace process.

    PDF icon Beyond-Kabul-Eng.pdf
  • A House Divided: Can Afghan Elites resolve their differences in the pursuit of peace?

    This report examines the range of views held by key members of the Afghan political elite about future prospects for peace, how these views compare to those held by civil society and women rights activists, and how they might be consolidated into a coherent platform in order to enable a common voice in negotiations with the Taliban. The report draws on 20 qualitative, semi-structured, in-depth interviews with representative from across the political spectrum and civil society in Afghanistan (six of whom were women) carried out in Kabul between mid-December 2019 and mid-February 2020.

    PDF icon A HOUSE DIVIDED - AWEC 2020.pdf
  • Survey of The Afghan People on The Intra-Afghan Peace Negotiations

    By Maryam Baryalay and Nasim Sadat of Social Research and Analysis Organisation; The survey of the Afghan people on the intra-Afghan peace process was conducted to explore the position of the Afghan population on key points and principal issues relating to the peace talks. The Afghan peace process has been lengthy and arduous, marked by breakthroughs, talks, derailments, and the collapse of talks ever since it unofficially began in 2008/9. Despite repeated impasses in the process, efforts continued in one way or another to build trust between the US and the Taliban, as well as between the Afghan government and the Taliban. In October 2018 the US government decided to engage in direct talks with the Taliban for the first time—a long-standing demand of the movement. After several rounds of talks over a period of 16 months, both sides finally reached an agreement in February 2020. The agreement contained four provisions: (1) halting attacks against US troops and interests by the Taliban, (2) reduction and withdrawal of US troops phasewise from Afghanistan, (3) releasing or swapping Afghan prisoners on both sides, and (4) starting intra-Afghan peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban.2

    PDF icon SURVEY OF THE AFGHAN PEOPLE ON THE INTRA-AFGHAN PEACE NEGOTIATIONS.pdf
  • Provincial Women’s Networks Perspectives and Recommendations for Intra-Afghan Negotiations

    Following the historic National Consultative Peace Jirga, which endorsed the release of the remaining 400 Taliban prisoners, all milestones for beginning the Intra-Afghan negotiations are achieved. Now no side has any excuse for delaying the negotiations. We, the members of Provincial Women’s Network from 15 provinces of Afghanistan, would like to encourage both the government and the Taliban to respect the call of Jirga delegates for beginning the negotiations as soon as possible...

    PDF icon Provincial Women's Networks Perspectives and Recommendations.pdf
  • The Afghan Tragedy, January 1988

    In 1988, the British & Irish Agencies Afghanistan Group (then the British Refugee Council) published one of the first reports on the situation in Afghanistan. The 'Afghan Tragedy' provides an unbiased description of the largest-scale human crisis in the world in those years. The 10 British voluntary agencies came together, under the auspices of BAAG, to raise the profiles of the millions of refugee and displaced Afghans. The agencies presented and adopted the recommendations at the end of the booklet at the 1987 International Council of Voluntary Agencies in Geneva.

    PDF icon The Afghan Tragedy, British Refugee Cuncil 1988-rotated.pdf
  • Distant Dreams - Understanding the aspirations of Afghan returnees

    This report is based on 56 iinterviews with returnees from Iran, Pakistan and Europe. The research reveals returnees’ aspirations and hopes for their future, including psychosocial challenges when reintegrating and how those suffering from more severe psychosocial conditions after return have also considered re-migration as a solution.The report was commissioned and led by MMC Asia and carried out by Seefar.

    PDF icon Distant Dreams - Understanding the aspirations of Afghan returnees.pdf
  • Afghanistan in January 2019; Key News

    Our monthly round-up of news in Afghanistan - January 2019.

    PDF icon Afghanistan in January 2019.pdf
  • Afghanistan in December 2018; Key News

    Our monthly round up of news in Afghanistan - December 2018.

    PDF icon ATM December 2018.pdf
  • Afghanistan in November 2018; Key News

    Our monthly round up of news in Afghanistan - November 2018.

    PDF icon Afghanistan in November 2018.pdf
  • Returns and Displacment in Afghanistan - BAAG Policy Position Paper autumn 2018

    BAAG is pleased to present its autumn 2018 Policy Position Paper on Returns and Displacment in Afghanistan. Afghanistan has experienced unprecedented levels of returns in recent years and, compounded by exponential rises in internal displacement, the situation now constitutes a major humanitarian crisis. Through the input of several national and international organisations operating in/ on Afghanistan this paper offers an insight into the challenges facing Afghans residing in host countries and their subsequent return to Afghanistan.

    PDF icon Returns & Displacement Position Paper - Autumn 2018.pdf
  • Fragile Future: The human cost of conflict in Afghanistan

     Emmanuel Tronc and Anaide Nahikian presents 'Fragile Future: The human cost of conflict in Afghanistan', part of the Humanitarian Action at the Frontlines field analysis series. Fragile Futures examines the humanitarian, political, societal, and economic dimensions that make the protracted conflict in Afghanistan intractable and precarious for civilian populations. The report is based on field visits to numerous regions in Afghanistan in July 2018—which included interviews and consultations with a variety of actors, including political stakeholders, humanitarian agencies, and populations affected by conflict—as well as a review of recent and relevant literature.  The purpose of this analysis is to (1) provide a current assessment of the conflict, drawing from field interviews and an indepth assemblage of various reports and resources, (2) examine the interconnected and interdependent interests fueling the conflict, and (3) suggest that if these dynamics persist in the way they have for decades, recent elections and peace talks will represent yet another setback for Afghan communities and a peaceful future for the country. 

    PDF icon SSRN-id3291982.pdf
  • Returning to what? The challenges displaced Afghans face in securing durable solutions

    NRC policy brief for the Geneva Conference on Afghanistan.

    PDF icon NRC-Policy_Brief-Return-screen.pdf
  • Ending the displacement trap: new opportunities for Afghans to achieve durable solutions

    ADSP briefing ahead of the Geneva Conference on Afghanistan.

    PDF icon ADSP_Briefing_Nov_18_Final.pdf

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