Resources

  • SAVE: The effects of insecurity on humanitarian coverage, July 2016

    Secure Access in Volatile Environments (SAVE) is a research programme. In this report they have asked how many aid agencies are able to access the most dangerous places, and how do access constraints affect ‘humanitarian coverage’ and the degree to which people in need are being reached by the aid system? Their findings highlight that aid agencies are fewer in number, with restricted movements and programmes, in the most insecure environments - with a direct impact on community support. Afghanistan is one of 4 case study programmes. 

    PDF icon 2016__The_effects_of_insecurity_on_humanitarian_coverage.pdf
  • UNAMA: Protection of civilians in armed conflict mid year report, July 2016

    5,166 civilians were recorded killed or maimed in just the first six months of 2016, of whom almost one-third were children. This represents a 4% increase on the same period in 2015, continuing the upward trend in civilian casualties in recent years. The total civilian casualty figure recorded by the UN between 1 January 2009 and 30 June 2016 has risen to 63,934, including 22,941 deaths and 40,993 injured.

    PDF icon protection_of_civilians_in_armed_conflict_midyear_report_2016_final.pdf
  • IRC: Afghan refugees and the European refugee crisis, July 2016

    Afghan refugees make up 21% of the over 1 million refugees who have fled to Europe since January 2015, fleeing a country with a worsening security situation and few prospects for its people. This briefing focuses on Afghan refugees and the European Refugee Crisis, and the continued conflict in the country from which they fled. In the briefing the IRC calls for action in four areas:1. Ensure a fair, thorough and effective asylum process for all nationalities2. Expand relocation to Afghans and accelerate family unity transfers from Greece to other EU countries3. Ensure Afghans and other non-Syrians in Turkey have meaningful access to temporary protection4. Commit to an expanded resettlement programme and safe alternative pathways into Europe

    PDF icon IRC European Refugee Crisis - Afghanistan briefing final (1).pdf
  • Development Initiatives: Global Humanitarian Assistance Report, June 2016

    In their annual global report, Afghanistan remained in the top 10 of countries receiving the most international humanitarian assistance.  Encouragingly across the 2015 UN-coordinated appeals (a collective ‘ask’ to the international community on the part of UN agencies), Afghanistan's was the 2nd best funded, at 70% met. The report highlights the links between chronic poverty and vulnerability to crises, and provides new analysis on the diversity and scale of resources already at play in preventing and responding to emergencies. It looks in detail at efforts to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of financing in crisis situations, such as multi-year approaches, more transparent and traceable funding, and flexible financing. 

    PDF icon Global-Humanitarian-Assistance-Report-2016.pdf
  • UNHCR: Global Trends Forced Migration report 2015, June 2016

    UNHCR's annual global report paints a bleak and shocking picture - by the end of 2015, one in 113 people was a refugee, displaced or an asylum seeker. Afghanistan continues to be the second largest country of origin, behind Syria. But 2015 saw increased voluntary returns of refugees, particularly to Afghanistan - yet this is a drop in the ocean.  Afghanistan also saw a large number of new internally displaced people in 2015 (492,600). 

    PDF icon UNHCR-Global-Trends-2015.pdf
  • CIDOB: The voices behind the refugee outflow from Afghanistan, June 2016

    The current narrative in the West explaining why Afghans are leaving is media-centric and misleading. Media commentary and the social media frenzy make little mention of the real voices of those Afghans who are leaving, often opting for a life of uncertainty in hopes of obtaining a refugee status in Western countries. Is leaving an easy decision? What factors are considered in choosing the target destination? How are the deteriorating socioeconomic conditions in the region affecting Afghans’ choice to leave their country? CIDOB (Barcelona Centre for International Affairs) conducted semi-structured interviews with a number of Afghans, independent experts and researchers, during the period from January to April 2016.

    PDF icon CIDOB Voices behind Refugees Jun16.pdf
  • Amnesty International: "My children will die this winter", May 2016

    Amnesty International calls on the Afghan government and the international community to do much more in tackling the country's growing displacement crisis. In just three years, the number of people who have been forced to flee their homes due to war has more than doubled to 1.2 million, with an average of nearly 1,000 newly displaced people per day in the first four months of 2016 alone. Displaced communities often find themselves living in squalid conditions, with minimal access to adequate housing, food, education or healthcare. The implementation of the government's 2014 IDP Policy has thus far failed to make any significant impact, mostly due to a lack of political will and capacity. 

    PDF icon AI My children will die this winter May16.PDF
  • ACBAR: Statement for the World Humanitarian Summit, May 2016

    Ahead of the World Humanitarian Summit (23-24 May 2016) in Istanbul, ACBAR, the Agency Coordinating Body of Afghan Relief and Development, have held various WHS consultation workshops in Kabul and four regional centers; Mazar, Herat, Kandahar and Jalalabad. Reviewing the frameworks in which NGOs work and devising more innovative and sustainable solutions to the county’s most pressing humanitarian needs, this paper presents their recommendations.  Attached also is their press release.Dari versions are available in the Dari reports section. 

    PDF icon ACBAR WHS Statement May 2016.pdf, PDF icon ACBAR Press Release May 2016.pdf
  • ACBAR: Dari Statement for the World Humanitarian Summit, May 2016

    Ahead of the World Humanitarian Summit (23-24 May 2016) in Istanbul, ACBAR, the Agency Coordinating Body of Afghan Relief and Development, have held various WHS consultation workshops in Kabul and four regional centers; Mazar, Herat, Kandahar and Jalalabad. Reviewing the frameworks in which NGOs work and devising more innovative and sustainable solutions to the county’s most pressing humanitarian needs, this paper presents their recommendations.  Attached also is their press release.English versions are available in the Humanitarian reports section. 

    PDF icon اعلامیه مطبوعاتی موسسه اکبر می 2016.pdf, PDF icon بیانیه موسسه اکبر برای نشست WHS.pdf
  • UNAMA: Annual report on the Protection of Civilians 2015, February 2016

    There is no reverse in the trend for increasing annual civilian casualty figures, as 2015 saw records broken again: 11,002 civilians injured or killed (7,457 and 3,545 respectively) is a 4% rise on 2014. Increased ground fighting in and around populated areas, along with suicide and other attacks in major cities, were the main causes of conflict-related civilian deaths and injuries in 2015. As UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein comments, “This is happening with almost complete impunity. The perpetrators of the violations, documented by UNAMA and my staff, must be held to account. And the international community should emphasise far more vigorously that the rights of civilians should be protected.”

    PDF icon unama-protection-of-civilians-annual-report-2015-final_0.pdf
  • OCHA: 2016 Humanitarian Needs Overview, December 2015

    Afghanistan’s civilian population continues to bear the brunt of a conflict growing in intensity and geographic scope. OCHA's annual report on likely humanitarian needs paints a grim picture for 2016, in which an already vulnerable population is exposed to greater risks of violence, are increasingly forced to flee their homes and livelihoods, and face high levels of malnutrition in a country where more than 70% of the population live in chronic poverty. 

    PDF icon OCHA afg_2016_hno_final_20151209.pdf
  • OCHA: Humanitarian Response Plan 2016, December 2015

    As noted by Humanitarian Coordinator Mark Bowden in his Foreword, 'effective humanitarian assistance and disaster relief will rely on adequate contingency stocks, improved rapid assessment procedures, and more nimble humanitarian financing and decision making.' The 2016 Operational plan anticipates that 8.3 million Afghans will need assistance, requiring US$393m. The report provides the Humanitarian Country Team's thematic operational response plans, alongside their wider strategy and capacity.  

    PDF icon afg_hrp_2016_english.pdf
  • UNAMA: Special Report on Kunduz Province, December 2015

    In addition to their twice-yearly Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict reports, UNAMA published this special report on the civilian casualties and human rights violations resulting from the Taliban siege and occupation of Kunduz city in October/November 2015. The report documents civilian deaths and injuries during the reporting period and presents preliminary findings on arbitrary killings, abductions, assault and other forms of violence, including threats and widespread criminality, the use of child fighters during the conflict, the impact on access to education, health, and freedom of movement. It provides a preliminary figure of 848 civilian casualties (289 deaths and 559 injured) that occurred in Kunduz province between 28 September and 13 October. These figures include 67 casualties (30 deaths and 37 injured) resulting from an airstrike carried out by international military forces on a Médecins Sans Frontières hospital on 3 October, an event that  is also examined in the report. [MSF reported later in December that the death toll had risen to 42]

    PDF icon UNAMA special_report_on_kunduz_province_12_december_2015.pdf
  • UNHCR: Mid Year Trends 2015, December 2015

    With almost a million people having crossed the Mediterranean as refugees and migrants so far in 2015, and conflicts in Syria, Afghanistan and elsewhere continuing to generate staggering levels of human suffering, 2015 is likely to exceed all previous records for global forced displacement, UNHCR warn this report. Covering the period from January to end June, the report looks at worldwide displacement resulting from conflict and persecution. The global refugee total, which a year ago was 19.5 million, had as of mid-2015 passed the 20 million threshold (20.2 million) for the first time since 1992. Asylum applications were meanwhile up 78 per cent (993,600) over the same period in 2014. And the numbers of internally displaced people jumped by around 2 million to an estimated 34 million.

    PDF icon UNHRC 2015-12-18_MY displacement.pdf
  • International Campaign to Ban Landmines: Landmine Monitor 2015, Nov. 2015

    The report states that the proportion of casualties caused by victim activated improvised explosive devices increased significantly (to 31%, up from 22% in 2013), with the casualties in Afghanistan accounting for the majority of the increase. Afghanistan experienced the greatest single rise in casualties, with 1,296 recorded in 2014 compared to 1,050 in 2013. The bulk of the increase was due to victim-activated improvised explosive devices, with 809 recorded in 2014 compared to 567 in 2013. There were 561 child casualties in Afghanistan in 2014, representing nearly half (46%) of all civilian casualties in that country where the age was known.  Support to mine action activities in Afghanistan dropped considerably, from $67.5 million in 2013 to $49.3 million in 2014.  

    PDF icon Landmine-Monitor-2015_finalpdf.pdf

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