Resources

  • IDMC: Global Estimates People displaced by disasters 2015, July 2015

    The Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, along with the Norwegian Refugee Council, present their annual report.  This one points to the man-made factors that drive an overall increasing trend in disaster displacement, like rapid economic development, urbanisation and population growth in hazard prone areas, arguing that these drivers are increasing the number of people becoming displaced, and the risk that their displacement becomes a long-term problem.  The report includes a spotlight on Afghanistan, highlighting the multiple hazards in conflict-affected and fragile states. 

    PDF icon IDMC-global-estimates-2015.pdf
  • IDMC: New and long-term IDPs risk becoming neglected as conflict intensifies, July 2015

    IDMC estimates that as of the end of June 2015, six months after the withdrawal of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), at least 948,000 people were living in displacement as a result of conflict and violence. The figure includes around 103,000 people newly displaced in the first six months of 2015.IDPs struggle to meet specific needs resulting from their displacement, in particular when it comes to accessing water, food, adequate housing and employment. These challenges are most pronounced in areas where they are inaccessible or invisible to humanitarian responders and as their displacement becomes more protracted.

    PDF icon IDMC afghanistan-overview-Jul15.pdf
  • BAAG: Policy position paper on Humanitarian Aid, July 2015

    Following the General Election in May 2015, BAAG and its members prepared a briefing pack for MPs and ministers.  These covered the themes of Governance, Human Rights, Service Delivery, Women's Rights and Humanitarian.  They each present an overview of the progress and remaining challenges in each area, and priority recommendations for the British government to consider in its support to Afghanistan. 

    PDF icon Policy Position Paper - Humanitarian final version 22Jul15.pdf
  • Samuel Hall: Agency & Choice among the Displaced, July 2015

    Samuel Hall's research explores issues in the decision-making processes for IDPs and returnees in both urban and rural areas and comments on the livelihood situation of both groups. It notes that incentives for refugees to return to Afghanistan appear to be diminishing and are now largely driven by a combination of push factors and emotional rather than material considerations.  Urbanisation is also considered, with findings showing that urban areas are seen to offer greater employment opportunities, security and public services, while those living in rural areas are likely to have been attracted by ethnic ties, the presence of friends, relatives, and cheaper accommodation. A set of recommendations for organisations working with the target communities follows, along with the need for concrete steps in the near future.

    PDF icon SH - Agency choice displaced July 2015.pdf
  • Development Initiatives: Global Humanitarian Assistance Report 2015, June 2015

    International humanitarian assistance rose for a second year, to a record US$24.5 billion in 2014. All of 2013’s largest donors gave more in 2014. Despite this rise, funding was not sufficient to meet needs. In response to the scale of need in 2014, UN-coordinated humanitarian appeals requested the highest amount of funding to date – a total of US$19.5 billion – yet a record US$7.5 billion of requirements went unmet.  Afghanistan in 2014 had the 5th largest population affected by humanitarian crises - 11.7m, or 38% of the total population.  In 2013, much international funding went to countries suffering protracted crises including Afghanistan, Sudan and the oPt.  However 2014 saw significant funding to acute needs, such as the conflicts in Syria and Iraq and the ebola crisis. 

    PDF icon GHA-Report-2015_Online.pdf
  • UNHCR: Global Trends in Forced Migration 2014, June 2015

    2014 saw the highest global forced displacement on record: 59.5 million individuals were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or human rights violations. This is 8.3 million persons more than the year before (51.2 million) and the highest annual increase in a single year. More than half (53%) of all refugees worldwide came from just three countries: the Syrian Arab Republic (3.88 million), Afghanistan (2.59 million), and Somalia (1.11 million).  Afghanistan remains the worlds largest protracted refugee crisis (see pg13 of the report).

    PDF icon UNHCR Global Trends 2015.pdf
  • HRW: The Mediterranean Migration Crisis, June 2015

    Human rights abuses in their home countries are the driving force behind the surge in boat migration in the Mediterranean to reach Europe, report Human Rights Watch. The first half of 2015 has seen a huge increase in the number of refugees and asylum seekers risking their lives in overcramped boats.  HRW has interviewed over 150 such people, the majority of whom come from Afghanistan, Syria and Somalia.  Their stories reveal the extent of rights abuses and violence in all three countries.  The report also calls on the EU to respond to their needs and rights in seeking refuge and asylum. 

    PDF icon HRW Mediterranean Crisis Jun15.pdf
  • OCHA: Major conflict-induced displacements, June 2015

    The start of the traditional spring fighting season has caused significant population movements in the Northern and Western regions, specifically in Badakhshan, Bagdhis and Kunduz provinces. Smaller scale conflict displacement has also been recorded in Baghlan, Farah, Faryab, Ghor, Herat, Jawzjan and Sar-e-pul Provinces.

    PDF icon OCHA afg_conflict_displacement_Jun2015.pdf
  • ACBAR: Humanitarian Action in Afghanistan - Towards the World Humanitarian Summit & Beyond, June 2015

    Following their World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) Afghanistan National Consultation in May 2015, ACBAR have produced this position paper.  It discusses the humanitarian situation in Afghanistan with a particular focus on the four themes of the WHS: humanitarian effectiveness, reducing vulnerability and managing risk, transformation through innovation, and serving the needs of people in conflict.The paper also provides recommendations to see humanitarian action in Afghanistan strengthened.

    PDF icon ACBAR WHS Position Paper 29.06.15.pdf
  • Costs of War: War-related Death, Injury & Displacement in Afghanistan & Pakistan, May 2015

    The Costs of War Project is a nonpartisan, nonprofit, scholarly initiative based at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies. The project and its reports analyzes the implications of the wars in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq in terms of human casualties, economic costs, and civil liberties.With war-related movement between Afghanistan and Pakistan, and cross-border military actions, the separate wars in the 2 countries are becoming one larger conflict. This report describes the two kinds of war-related death and injury: direct deaths due to violence, and deaths caused indirectly due to the effects of the destruction of infrastructure and displacement.

    PDF icon Costs of War - War Related Casualties Afghanistan & Pakistan 2001-2014.pdf
  • IDMC: Global Overview 2015, May 2015

    The Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) and Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) present their annual report on internal displacements.  Afghanistan, covered in the South Asia section, saw an increase in IDPs from 631,000 in 2013 to 805,400 by December 2014.  As in previous years, much of Afghanistan's new displacement took place in the south and east. The document provides commentary on protection issues, durable solutions and the national and international response.  It also includes a special report on how displacement affects livelihoods and a section on protracted internal displacement. 

    PDF icon NRC IDMC global-overview-2015.pdf
  • HRW: Attacks on Health, May 2015

    The second joint global report by the Safeguarding Health in Conflict Coalition and Human Rights Watch documents attacks on, and interference with, health workers, patients, facilities, and transports during periods of armed conflict or political violence.  Afghanistan, with Syria and Iraq, is one of the highest risk countries. From 1st January to 15th August 2014, 41 incidents were reported where hospitals, clinics, and health personnel were attacked.  Afghans have been denied access to services temporarily or permanently because of conflict near health facilities.  Additionally, patients have been harrassed at checkpoints as they try to reach hospitals and clinics. 

    PDF icon HRW Attacks on Hospitals 0515.pdf
  • BAAG: Humanitarian context & recommendations, April 2015

    In the run up to the British general election, BAAG worked with the Humanitarian group of BOND, the UK network of aid organisations, to produce a series of briefing papers for the new cohort of British MPs.  BAAG contributed a paper outlining the current humanitarian context and needs in Afghanistan, and presented a short series of priority recommendations for MPs to consider.  

    PDF icon Afghanistan Humanitarian Context & Policy Recommendations FINAL 10Apr.pdf
  • Chatham House: The Impact of IEDs on the Humanitarian Space in Afghanistan, April 2015

    Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are an increasingly common feature of the conflict in Afghanistan and they pose a growing threat to humanitarian organizations operating there. This paper considers the features of IEDs that distinguish them from other threats facing humanitarians and how their use may indicate a more fundamental challenge to the humanitarian sector: the erosion of the principles of neutrality and impartiality owing to the increasing militarization and politicization of humanitarian aid. Using the specific example of their effects in Afghanistan, this paper assesses the risks IEDs pose and highlights the negative impacts on humanitarian operations that measures used to mitigate this risk can have. 

    PDF icon CH - IED impact on humanitarian space Apr15.pdf
  • NRC: Listening to women & girls displaced to urban Afghanistan, March 2015

    The findings of this report, by Norwegian Refugee Council and The Liaison Office, confound the common assumption that urban women and girls should be more able – in a supposedly more secure and progressive urban environment with a concentration of service providers – to access services and employment and social opportunities than prior to their displacement. This research found the opposite, showing that displacement places women and children at disproportionate risk, living with fewer freedoms and opportunities than those they enjoyed in their natal villages or when living in Pakistan or Iran. The report presents findings of research in three informal settlements in Jalalabad, Kabul and Kandahar.

    PDF icon NRC - displaced women & girls Mar15.pdf

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