Resources

  • HRW: Attacks on Health, May 2015

    The second joint global report by the Safeguarding Health in Conflict Coalition and Human Rights Watch documents attacks on, and interference with, health workers, patients, facilities, and transports during periods of armed conflict or political violence.  Afghanistan, with Syria and Iraq, is one of the highest risk countries. From 1st January to 15th August 2014, 41 incidents were reported where hospitals, clinics, and health personnel were attacked.  Afghans have been denied access to services temporarily or permanently because of conflict near health facilities.  Additionally, patients have been harrassed at checkpoints as they try to reach hospitals and clinics. 

    PDF icon HRW Attacks on Hospitals 0515.pdf
  • Costs of War: War-related Death, Injury & Displacement in Afghanistan & Pakistan, May 2015

    The Costs of War Project is a nonpartisan, nonprofit, scholarly initiative based at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies. The project and its reports analyzes the implications of the wars in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq in terms of human casualties, economic costs, and civil liberties.With war-related movement between Afghanistan and Pakistan, and cross-border military actions, the separate wars in the 2 countries are becoming one larger conflict. This report describes the two kinds of war-related death and injury: direct deaths due to violence, and deaths caused indirectly due to the effects of the destruction of infrastructure and displacement.

    PDF icon Costs of War - War Related Casualties Afghanistan & Pakistan 2001-2014.pdf
  • Chatham House: The Impact of IEDs on the Humanitarian Space in Afghanistan, April 2015

    Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are an increasingly common feature of the conflict in Afghanistan and they pose a growing threat to humanitarian organizations operating there. This paper considers the features of IEDs that distinguish them from other threats facing humanitarians and how their use may indicate a more fundamental challenge to the humanitarian sector: the erosion of the principles of neutrality and impartiality owing to the increasing militarization and politicization of humanitarian aid. Using the specific example of their effects in Afghanistan, this paper assesses the risks IEDs pose and highlights the negative impacts on humanitarian operations that measures used to mitigate this risk can have. 

    PDF icon CH - IED impact on humanitarian space Apr15.pdf
  • BAAG: Humanitarian context & recommendations, April 2015

    In the run up to the British general election, BAAG worked with the Humanitarian group of BOND, the UK network of aid organisations, to produce a series of briefing papers for the new cohort of British MPs.  BAAG contributed a paper outlining the current humanitarian context and needs in Afghanistan, and presented a short series of priority recommendations for MPs to consider.  

    PDF icon Afghanistan Humanitarian Context & Policy Recommendations FINAL 10Apr.pdf
  • PSR: Body Count - civilian casualty figures after 10 years of the War on Terror, March 2015

    Civilian casualty reporting in Afghanistan is incomplete and practically impossible.  But understanding the real humanitarian and social consequences of political decisions in favor of military intervention is important. This publication by Pysicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) and 2 other organisations, shows how difficult it has been to grasp the real dimensions of these wars and how rare independent and nonpartisan casualty assessments have been.  No verifiable complete figures are available - for example, the "passive" figures so far relied upon are only those from hospitals and morgues or reported by the media. Given the customary practice in Afghanistan of burying the dead within 24 hours, these are bound to be extremely conservative.  Therefore the researchers use various sources, consider factors from other countries and posit projections.   

    PDF icon Body_Count_first_international_edition_2015_final.pdf
  • NRC: Listening to women & girls displaced to urban Afghanistan, March 2015

    The findings of this report, by Norwegian Refugee Council and The Liaison Office, confound the common assumption that urban women and girls should be more able – in a supposedly more secure and progressive urban environment with a concentration of service providers – to access services and employment and social opportunities than prior to their displacement. This research found the opposite, showing that displacement places women and children at disproportionate risk, living with fewer freedoms and opportunities than those they enjoyed in their natal villages or when living in Pakistan or Iran. The report presents findings of research in three informal settlements in Jalalabad, Kabul and Kandahar.

    PDF icon NRC - displaced women & girls Mar15.pdf
  • Development Initiatives: An Act of Faith - humanitarian financing & Zakat, March 2015

    Discussions abound regarding the increasing scale of humanitarian crises and the financing gaps these face. One potentially significant area of charitable giving that has received relatively little attention in discussions on the current humanitarian financing crisis is faith-based giving, and Islamic financing in particular. An Act of Faith explores the purpose, scale and potential of Zakat – one of the main tools of Islamic social financing – for financing humanitarian response. It provides a basis on which to open up discussions around how that potential might be maximised – both by increasing the overall volume of Zakat collected (rather than redirecting existing funds) and improving the mechanisms available to channel Zakat to the humanitarian response.

    PDF icon DevInt-Zakat_report_V9a.pdf, PDF icon Zakat beneficiaries.pdf
  • UNAMA: 2014 Annual Report, Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict, February 2015

    UNAMA documented 10,548 civilian casualties in 2014, the highest number recorded in a single year since 2009. For the first time since 2009, more Afghan civilians were killed and injured in ground engagements than by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) or any other tactic.  These ground engagements increasingly used explosive weapons systems such as mortars, rockets and grenades, sometimes indiscriminately, in civilian-populated areas - leading to devastating consequences for civilians.

    PDF icon UNAMA Protection-of-Civilians-annual report 2014.pdf
  • OCHA: 2015 Humanitarian Needs Overview, November 2014

    OCHA's report details the main humanitarian needs and outlook for 2015.  It provides vulnerability report per cluster, humanitarian response capacity and information on refugees and returnees.  Monthly updates are also available on https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/operations/afghanistan

    PDF icon 2015 Hum Needs Overview Final 24Dec2014.pdf
  • UNHCR: Towards Self-Reliance & Sustainable Reintegration - Solutions for Afghan Refugees, November 2014

    The statistics on Afghanistan's refugee situation are staggering - 1 in 5 Afghans in the country has been a refugee, 1 in 5 refugees around the world are Afghan. UNHCR runs the programme for reintegration of returning refugess in Afghanistan.  The Afghan government and international community have previously committed to the returnee process in both the TMAF and the Solutions Strategy for Afghan Refugees (SSAR).  However both are beset with problems.  UNHCR's paper calls upon the participants of December's London Conference on Afghanistan to focus on the needs of returnees and IDPs. 

    PDF icon UNHCR London Conference Position Paper FINAL.pdf
  • GICHD: The Humanitarian & developmental impact of anti-vehicle mines, October 2014

    Anti-vehicle mines (AVMs) are as indiscriminate as anti-personnel mines (APMs) and constitute the source of many casualties. As the international community explores the possible options for further legal regulation of AVMs, there is a need for more rigorous analysis of the impact of anti-vehicle mines on civilians and developing societies that are either in the midst of or recovering from conflict.To bridge this gap, the Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD) and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) undertook a study to document the humanitarian and developmental impact of anti-vehicle mines.  Their report includes Afghanistan as one of three case-studies. 

    PDF icon AVM-study-Sep2014.pdf
  • Handicap International: Afghan civilians - Victims of NATO negligence, September 2014

    In the week of the NATO Summit in Wales, in which Afghanistan will be a key agenda point, Handicap International have called upon NATO and its members to prioritise the marking and clearing of mines, explosive remnants of war and the provision of assistance to victims of the conflict.  Their press pack highlights the extent of the ERW contamination in the country, the implications of this for civilians, and testimonies of those who have lost limbs as a result of mines and other ERW. 

    File HI-Afghanistan-ERW-contamination Sept 14.docx
  • IRC: Protecting the most vulnerable - humanitarian needs in Afghanistan, September 2014

    BAAG members IRC, CARE and Afghanaid have joined with the Norwegian Refugee Council to highlight the humanitarian plight of millions of Afghans.  As policy makers start to consider the development priorities of the country ahead of the London Conference later this year, humanitarian needs risk being ignored.  This paper, endorsed by BAAG, presents practical recommendations for the Afghan government and international community to implement life-saving response and resilience policies and practices.

    PDF icon Afghanistan Humanitarian Paper 2014.pdf
  • ACF: Afghanistan - back to the reality of needs, September 2014

    Action Contre Faim (Action against Hunger) call for a shift in thinking by the international donors and community to address humanitarian and development financing.  Since 2012 the Afghan government took responsibility for disbursement of aid budgets - but were not supported sufficiently for doing so.  Subsequently funding decisions and mechanisms have impacted the quality and reach of aid and development programmes, to the detriment of local communities and the most vulnerable. Essential aid activities have suffered as a result of political decisions - ACF call on the Afghan government, international donors and NGOs to consider alternative policies and practices. 

    PDF icon ACF_Afghanistan_backtotherealityofneeds_sept14_reportBDef.pdf
  • IMC: Livelihoods needs assessment at returnee sites, August 2014

    IMC - the International Medical Corp - has long worked in the settlements for Afghan returnees in the Eastern region.  From 2010 to 2012 they delivered vocational training and literacy programmes. In order to effectively respond to the community’s current needs, IMC initiated a focus group discussion in the returnee sites of Nangarhar and Kunar.  Their findings revealed that returnees in the assessed sites have a very low income (e.g. between $70-80 a month), which has further dropped due to insecurity and election dilemma.  Due to a lack of jobs, the returnees’ food intake is low and there are cases where children have dropped out of school and are now engaged in child labor.  Overall, most of the returnees believe they had a better life while they were living as refugees in Pakistan compared to living in their own country.

    PDF icon IMC returnee livelihoods assessment Afghanistan.pdf

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