Resources

  • OCHA: Humanitarian Update, August 2014

    UNAMA civilian casualty reports earlier this year are echoed in OCHA's update, stating the 25% increase on last year is disproportianately affecting women and children.  In other updates, the shelter needs of April's flood victims have not been fully met and winter approaches, and August saw a significant increase on attacks against humanitarian staff. 

    PDF icon OCHA hum update_August_2014_Final.pdf
  • HPG: Negotiating perceptions - Al-Shabaab & Taliban views of aid agencies, July 2014

    Part of the HPGs project 'Humanitarian negotiations with armed non-state actors', this paper explores how both of these armed groups perceive aid agencies and the implications on humanitarian response in those areas.  When their decisions to grant or deny access to populations in need, these are life-saving challenges. 

    PDF icon HPG Negotiating perceptions Al-Shabaab and Taliban Jul14.pdf
  • IDMC: As humanitarian space shrinks, IDP policy must be implemented, June 2014

    Internal displacement is on the rise in Afghanistan, as insecurity threatens or affects various provinces.  In November 2013 the National IDP Policy was adopted by the Afghan government.  Sadly, implementation of the policy since then has stalled due to lack of political will and capacity on the part of the Ministry of Refugees and Repatriation (MoRR).This comprehensive report by the International Displacement Monitoring Centre and Norwegian Refugee Council highlights the various causes of displacement in Afghanistan, the protection concerns faced by IDPs and suggests durable solutions for national and international agencies. 

    PDF icon IDMC-afghanistan-IDPS overview-en.pdf
  • HRW: Under Attack - Violence against health workers, patients & facilities, May 2014

    Human Rights Watch and the Safeguarding Health in Conflict Coalition report on the unacceptable attacks on those offering health support in conflict zones.  The ICRC (International Committee of the Red Cross) identified 1,809 specific incidents of violence targetting health workers or facilities in 2012-2013. In Afghanistan (page 17), dozens of attacks - including deaths - were reported in 2013.  As elsewhere, these attacks do not just affect the communities using those local facilities - they affect the wider population when health operations have to be suspended or curtailed, or when health workers are reluctant to work in insecure areas.  

    PDF icon HRW Under Attack - violence health workers May14.pdf
  • OCHA: Situation Reports Flash Floods, April 2014

    Following heavy rain since 24 April 2014, 10 provinces in the north and west of Afghanistan have been affected by deadly flash floods.  Unverified sources claim 132 deaths and 39,000 Afghans requiring humanitarian assistance. OCHA produce regular 'sit reps' detailing needs and responses - attached is their 2nd update on the situation, but all further reports can be found on their Afghanistan website: https://afg.humanitarianresponse.info/

    PDF icon OCHA Situation Report_Afghanistan Flash Floods_28April2014_v4-3.pdf
  • ORG: The UN and Casualty Recording, April 2014

    The Oxford Research Group's report explores the current state of casualty recording practice, and use of information about casualties, within the UN.It concludes that when the UN systematically records the direct civilian casualties of violent conflict, and acts effectively on this information, this can help save civilian lives. However, casualty recording is not currently a widespread practice within the UN system.This report looks at experiences of, and attitudes towards, casualty recording from the perspectives of UN staff based in New York and Geneva. It includes a case study of UN civilian casualty recording by the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan’s Human Rights unit. Finally, the report discusses challenges to UN casualty recording, and how these might be met.

    PDF icon ORG-UN-and-Casualty Recording.pdf
  • HPG: Humanitarian negotiations with armed non-state actors, March 2014

    Despite insurgents and armed groups increasingly targetting aid workers - including attacking them, looting their humanitarian supplies, extorting money or denying their access to regions or entire countries - the humanitarian sector has long recognised  the need to talk to such groups to increase their access to communities in need.However very little information regarding the groups is available to humanitarians, making it difficult for organisations to successfully engage with these actors to gain access to populations under their control.The Humanitarian Policy Group's brief highlights key lessons from a two-year research project on humanitarian negotiations with armed non-state actors (ANSAs) in Afghanistan, Somalia and Sudan. It draws from over 500 interviews with aid workers, members of armed groups (including the Taliban, Al-Shabaab and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North) and others.

    PDF icon HPG Humanitarian negotiations Mar2014.pdf
  • IDMC: Still at Risk, February 2014

    This report by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC), part of the Norwegian Refugee Council, explores the issue of forced eviction of Afghan refugees and returnees.  It finds that over 57,000 people have suffered forced eviction, with very few provisions made for them.  Laws adopted by the Afghan government in November, which provide provisions for preventing forced evictions and mitigating the harm and suffering they cause, should go some way to reducing this problem. 

    PDF icon Still at risk.pdf
  • OCHA: Humanitarian Update, December 2013

    The December report includes updates on winterisation activities, increased civilian casualties in 2013 and reduced funding requests for Afghanistan's acute humanitarian needs. These monthly reports can be accessed via this website: https://afg.humanitarianresponse.info/search/type/document

    PDF icon OCHA Humanitarian Update Dec13.pdf
  • HPG/ODI: The Search for Common Ground, April 2013

    Through a series of case studies and other exchanges, this project aims to provide contextual analysis of how civil–military coordination mechanisms have functioned in disaster and conflict contexts in Afghanistan from 2002- 2013. Of key concern is what impact civil–military coordination mechanisms have had on the efficiency or effectiveness of humanitarian response, and on outcomes for affected populations.

    PDF icon The Search for Common Ground April 2013.pdf
  • ODI: Talking to the Other Side, December 2012

    The first substantive research of its kind into aid access, this report and policy brief by the Overseas Development Institute examines how aid agencies engage with the Taliban to gain access to Afghans in need of assistance. Compiled after almost 150 interviews with Afghans, aid agencies, the Taliban and diplomats, it offers a series of recommendations on humanitarian negotiations.

    PDF icon ODI Talking to the other side Full Report.pdf, PDF icon ODI Talking to the other side Policy Brief.pdf
  • IDC: Afghanistan: Development, progress and prospects after 2014, October 2012

    The UK Parliament's International Development Committee recommends that the British government revise its aid priorities in Afghanistan, giving greater emphasis to humanitarian aid, providing basic services and alleviating poverty.The report, released in October 2012, called for more to be done to meet the needs of vulnerable Afghan communities as international forces prepare to leave the country.It recommends that the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) reconsider its current policy of trying to build a “viable state” in Afghanistan and instead give higher priority to humanitarian and development projects.

    PDF icon Afghanistan Development, progress and prospects after 2014 Oct. 2012.pdf
  • NGOs and Humanitarian Reform: Mapping Study Afghanistan Report, May 2009

    This report highlights key challenges and dilemmas that the humanitarian community in general, and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in particular, are facing in Afghanistan today. The report concludes with two overarching recommendations. The first is that in order to enhance the perception of neutrality, independence and impartiality of their humanitarian activities, particularly in those areas of the country where working with legitimate local authorities is no longer possible, NGOs should establish a Humanitarian Consortium that would distinguish itself from other actors on the ground by a recognizable symbol (e.g. pink vehicles or a particular logo) and by a set of 3 principled, clear and transparent operational guidelines.The second relates to the urgent need to launch a communications strategy aimed at the general public and all belligerents to explain the principles, objectives and modus operandi of consortium agencies. This should include efforts to ensure that the vernacular media provide a balanced presentation of humanitarian activities, a campaign to sensitise decision-makers at the sub-national level (provincial councils, governors, leading mullahs), including efforts directed at influencing the leadership of the insurgency on humanitarian access and the rights of civilians caught up in conflict.

    PDF icon 0294-Donini-2009-NGOs-and-Humanitarian-Reform-Mapping-Study-Afghanistan-Report.pdf

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