Resources

  • Afghanistan Update; United Kingdom

    Dear Colleagues, The developments in Afghanistan over the last few weeks have been extremely difficult to witness. We know many of you, like thousands of people around the country, have been closely involved in working to make Afghanistan a better place over the last two decades and have a deep connection with the country and its people. Yesterday’s callous attacks on innocent people outside Kabul airport brought into stark relief the fragility of the situation in Afghanistan. It was also a terrible reminder of the challenges we face both in getting people to safety now and supporting the country in the long-term. Our thoughts are with the families of all those who lost their lives, including several US service personnel and many Afghan civilians. As you know, in line with US military deadlines and our operational objectives, the UK evacuation effort at Kabul airport, Operation PITTING is concluding. We wanted to update you on the end of our current process and what follows next, including the return of nearly 1,000 HMG personnel over the coming days. We have worked at unprecedented pace to facilitate the largest and most complex evacuation in living memory. The Armed Forces, MoD, FCDO and Home Office staff have worked incredibly hard in very difficult circumstances to bring out over 13,000 people over the last two weeks. This number includes British nationals and their dependants, Afghans who worked for the UK government and military and their dependants, and other Afghans who are at particularly high risk. We have also supported our allies and partners to help their nationals to safety wherever possible. This has only been possible thanks to the extraordinary efforts of UK troops and government officials on the ground, who put themselves in harm’s way and worked around the clock to evacuate as many people as possible. We are grateful for all your efforts to direct those in need of support towards assistance. Our consular teams have been able to reach many in need thanks to your help. A whole of government effort will support and integrate our Afghan friends into UK society through this traumatic period...PLEASE CLICK ON THE ATTACHED DOCUMENT TO READ THE FULL STATEMENT.

    PDF icon 20210827 Afghanistan Update Dear Colleague letter.pdf
  • Urgent Demand for Inclusion in the “Accelerated Afghan Peace Talks”

    Afghan society including civil society organisations, community leaders, religious scholars, youth, women activists and networks, victims, professional organisations, religious scholars, Tribal/Community leaders, scholars, experts, men and more, have in this historic National Peace Gathering, brought together over 1350 Afghan society representatives from every District and Province in Afghanistan and many more Afghan Diaspora have participated via a Facebook livestream.

    PDF icon Statement of National Peace Gathering-English Version.pdf
  • Beyond Kabul: Women Peace Builder's Reflection on the Peace Process and the Impact of Covid-19

    This research report was drafted by the Afghan Women’s Educational Center (AWEC), synthesizing insights from one hundred and fifty telephone interviews with women peacebuilders and negotiators from eight provinces of Afghanistan (Badakhshan, Kandahar, Herat, Helmand, Paktia, Nangarhar, Kabul, Balkh). It was conducted at a critical juncture, as the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan (GoIRA) entered into talks with the Taliban. Since the beginning of the United States talks with the Taliban, women across Afghanistan have increased their voice for women participation in peace processes as equal citizen of the country in welcoming the possibility of peace, while raising concerns that their rights may be compromised if the process is conducted hastily and they are not substantially represented. This policy brief aims to ensure that women’s voices are heard in upcoming political dialogues and during the intra-Afghan peace process.

    PDF icon Beyond-Kabul-Eng.pdf
  • A House Divided: Can Afghan Elites resolve their differences in the pursuit of peace?

    This report examines the range of views held by key members of the Afghan political elite about future prospects for peace, how these views compare to those held by civil society and women rights activists, and how they might be consolidated into a coherent platform in order to enable a common voice in negotiations with the Taliban. The report draws on 20 qualitative, semi-structured, in-depth interviews with representative from across the political spectrum and civil society in Afghanistan (six of whom were women) carried out in Kabul between mid-December 2019 and mid-February 2020.

    PDF icon A HOUSE DIVIDED - AWEC 2020.pdf
  • Survey of The Afghan People on The Intra-Afghan Peace Negotiations

    By Maryam Baryalay and Nasim Sadat of Social Research and Analysis Organisation; The survey of the Afghan people on the intra-Afghan peace process was conducted to explore the position of the Afghan population on key points and principal issues relating to the peace talks. The Afghan peace process has been lengthy and arduous, marked by breakthroughs, talks, derailments, and the collapse of talks ever since it unofficially began in 2008/9. Despite repeated impasses in the process, efforts continued in one way or another to build trust between the US and the Taliban, as well as between the Afghan government and the Taliban. In October 2018 the US government decided to engage in direct talks with the Taliban for the first time—a long-standing demand of the movement. After several rounds of talks over a period of 16 months, both sides finally reached an agreement in February 2020. The agreement contained four provisions: (1) halting attacks against US troops and interests by the Taliban, (2) reduction and withdrawal of US troops phasewise from Afghanistan, (3) releasing or swapping Afghan prisoners on both sides, and (4) starting intra-Afghan peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban.2

    PDF icon SURVEY OF THE AFGHAN PEOPLE ON THE INTRA-AFGHAN PEACE NEGOTIATIONS.pdf
  • Afghan Women Demand a Just and Accountable Peace

    Dear Leaders of the Member States of NATO and the United Nations,As we mark nineteen years since the devastating attack on the World Trade Center which claimed more than 3,000 innocent lives and the ousting of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan, we send this letter on behalf of 15,0001 Afghan women from across Afghanistan to thank our international allies for their sacrifices and support in helping us rebuild our democratic systems, broken institutions, and empowering our youth to use their energy and talent for developing our country...

    PDF icon Afghan Women Letter to NATO Member States and United Nations.pdf
  • Provincial Women’s Networks Perspectives and Recommendations for Intra-Afghan Negotiations

    Following the historic National Consultative Peace Jirga, which endorsed the release of the remaining 400 Taliban prisoners, all milestones for beginning the Intra-Afghan negotiations are achieved. Now no side has any excuse for delaying the negotiations. We, the members of Provincial Women’s Network from 15 provinces of Afghanistan, would like to encourage both the government and the Taliban to respect the call of Jirga delegates for beginning the negotiations as soon as possible...

    PDF icon Provincial Women's Networks Perspectives and Recommendations.pdf
  • Afghanistan in January 2019; Key News

    Our monthly round-up of news in Afghanistan - January 2019.

    PDF icon Afghanistan in January 2019.pdf
  • Afghanistan in December 2018; Key News

    Our monthly round up of news in Afghanistan - December 2018.

    PDF icon ATM December 2018.pdf
  • Afghanistan in November 2018; Key News

    Our monthly round up of news in Afghanistan - November 2018.

    PDF icon Afghanistan in November 2018.pdf
  • The State of the Enabling Environment of Civil Society in Afghanistan 2018

    This is the third iteration of the State of the Enabling Environment of Civil Society in Afghanistan (SEECA) research produced by the Afghanistan Institute for Civil Society (AICS). In this research, civil society is defined as a third "space" outside the state and market wherein actors and groups participate to advance common interests, which is less restraining than he conventional definition that focuses on organisations only. This report presents key recommendations for both government, civil society and international donors to ensure prosperity in Afghanistan. 

    PDF icon AICS-SEECA-2018.pdf
  • Incremental Peace in Afghanistan 2018

    BAAG is pleased to share the latest publication of Conciliation Resources Accord series titled 'An Incremental Peace in Afghanistan'. Conciliation Resources is an independent international organisation working with people in conflict to prevent violence, resolve conflicts and promote peaceful societies. 'An Incremental Peace in Afghanistan' brings together a variety of voices to discuss pathways to peace in Afghanistan. BAAG's Director Jawed Nader and Trustee Fleur Roberts were pleased to contribute to this research through exploring 'Inclusive Local Peace Building in Afghanistan' and asking 'how have local peacebuilding initiatives contributed to inclusive peace in Afghanistan?'   

    PDF icon Accord-Afghanistan-Report-27-WEB.pdf Accord Issue 27 'Incremental Peace in Afghanistan'
  • Inclusive Peacebuilding Approaches in Afghanistan 2018

    This research focuses on inclusive peacebuilding approaches in Afghanistan as carried out by NonGovernmental Organisations (NGOs), with a focus on community and civil society participation, and partnership models in Afghanistan. 

    PDF icon Peacebuilding paper public version upd 05Mar18.pdf
  • Afghanistan in May 2017

    Our monthly review of the key news from Afghanistan.

    PDF icon Afghanistan in May17.pdf
  • AREU: Transitional Justice - Views from the Ground on How Afghanistan Fares, November 2016

    Transitional justice is a vehicle that renews the trust between the population and the state. It is the range of processes and mechanisms associated with society’s attempts to come to terms with the legacy of large-scale abuses, to ensure accountability, serve justice, and achieve reconciliation. Speaking to respondents across five Afghan provinces, this study seeks the views of Afghans on their preferred transitional justice policies, and whether these policies should be a precursor or linked to the peace process. Further, the research specifically seeks the views on whether any type of compromises should be made in the current context. In particular, it asks across five provinces whether accountability for past human rights abuses remains a priority. A Policy Note accompanies this, Perceptions of Peace and Justice from the Field - Eleven Years after ‘A Call for Justice'

    PDF icon AREU Transitional Justice-Views from the Ground on How Afghanistan Fares.pdf, PDF icon AREU Perceptions of Peace and Justice from the Field -- Eleven Years after “A Call for Justice.pdf

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