Humanitarian

  • OCHA: Afghanistan Humanitarian Dashboard, September 2013

    The humanitarian situation in Afghanistan continues to worsen, as manifested by a sharp rise in civilian casualties, especially among women and children. There is also a steady flow of new conflict IDPs from across the country's 34 provinces, approaching 600,000 people. The nature of displacement is increasingly fluid in nature, and the number of aid workers caught up in violent attacks is growing. Targeting of aid workers impedes the timeliness, quality and reach of emergency response to IDPs and other conflict affected populations.

    PDF icon Afg_Humanitarian_Dashboard_August2013.pdf
  • HPG/ODI: The Search for Common Ground, April 2013

    Through a series of case studies and other exchanges, this project aims to provide contextual analysis of how civil–military coordination mechanisms have functioned in disaster and conflict contexts in Afghanistan from 2002- 2013. Of key concern is what impact civil–military coordination mechanisms have had on the efficiency or effectiveness of humanitarian response, and on outcomes for affected populations.

    PDF icon The Search for Common Ground April 2013.pdf
  • UN / OCHA Common Humanitarian Action Plan, January 2013

    The United Nations’ humanitarian coordinator, OCHA, is predicting a bleak year for Afghanistan, with further violence and a worsening humanitarian situation.The UN says the number of civilian casualties and displaced people is continuing to rise as the armed conflict spreads to most provinces of the country.  It is appealing for  $471 million to help the most vulnerable Afghans during 2013 and says it has drawn up a list of priorities, ranking provinces according to greatest need.

    PDF icon 2013_Afghanistan_CHAP.pdf
  • ODI: Talking to the Other Side, December 2012

    The first substantive research of its kind into aid access, this report and policy brief by the Overseas Development Institute examines how aid agencies engage with the Taliban to gain access to Afghans in need of assistance. Compiled after almost 150 interviews with Afghans, aid agencies, the Taliban and diplomats, it offers a series of recommendations on humanitarian negotiations.

    PDF icon ODI Talking to the other side Full Report.pdf, PDF icon ODI Talking to the other side Policy Brief.pdf
  • IDC: Afghanistan: Development, progress and prospects after 2014, October 2012

    The UK Parliament's International Development Committee recommends that the British government revise its aid priorities in Afghanistan, giving greater emphasis to humanitarian aid, providing basic services and alleviating poverty.The report, released in October 2012, called for more to be done to meet the needs of vulnerable Afghan communities as international forces prepare to leave the country.It recommends that the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) reconsider its current policy of trying to build a “viable state” in Afghanistan and instead give higher priority to humanitarian and development projects.

    PDF icon Afghanistan Development, progress and prospects after 2014 Oct. 2012.pdf
  • NGOs and Humanitarian Reform: Mapping Study Afghanistan Report, May 2009

    This report highlights key challenges and dilemmas that the humanitarian community in general, and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in particular, are facing in Afghanistan today. The report concludes with two overarching recommendations. The first is that in order to enhance the perception of neutrality, independence and impartiality of their humanitarian activities, particularly in those areas of the country where working with legitimate local authorities is no longer possible, NGOs should establish a Humanitarian Consortium that would distinguish itself from other actors on the ground by a recognizable symbol (e.g. pink vehicles or a particular logo) and by a set of 3 principled, clear and transparent operational guidelines.The second relates to the urgent need to launch a communications strategy aimed at the general public and all belligerents to explain the principles, objectives and modus operandi of consortium agencies. This should include efforts to ensure that the vernacular media provide a balanced presentation of humanitarian activities, a campaign to sensitise decision-makers at the sub-national level (provincial councils, governors, leading mullahs), including efforts directed at influencing the leadership of the insurgency on humanitarian access and the rights of civilians caught up in conflict.

    PDF icon 0294-Donini-2009-NGOs-and-Humanitarian-Reform-Mapping-Study-Afghanistan-Report.pdf

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