Governance

  • UNAMA: Justice through the Eyes of Afghan Women, April 2015

    UNAMA and UNOHCHR jointly report on the reality for Afghan women seeking redress for violent crimes against them. Exploring the cases of 110 women, they find that 65% women opt, or are forced, to use mediation services rather than the criminal prosecution service.  Reasons for this include lack of trust in the latter and concerns over household income if a perpetrator is imprisoned. In at least 6 mediation cases, the women were excluded from the sessions, raising human rights concerns.  And in over 50% of mediation cases, the perpetrators failed to honour the agreement, and in some cases reoffended. The report presents various recommendations to the Afghan government and the international community, including accreditation and regulatory frameworks for mediators and providing women with additional civil remedies such as restraint & protection orders. 

    PDF icon Justice_through_eyes_of_Afghan_women_UNAMA OHCRH.pdf
  • HRW: Today we shall all die, March 2015

    Human Rights Watch's report details a culture of impunity that the group says flourished after the fall of the Taliban, driven by the desire for immediate control of security at almost any price. The report focuses on 8 commanders & officials across Afghanistan, some among the country’s most powerful men, and key allies for foreign troops. Some are accused of personally inflicting violence, others of having responsibility for militias or government forces that committed the crimes. HRW call for the Afghan government to prosecute those guilty of such crimes, and for the international community to apply pressure on this. 

    PDF icon HRW Today we shall all die Mar15.pdf
  • AREU: Separation of Powers under the Afghan Constitution, March 2015

    As part of an AREU project to evaluate the Afghan Constitution, their latest paper examines the issue of the separation of powers under the current Constitution and finds that it suffers from flaws both on paper and in practice.Using the case study of Parliament’s no-confidence vote practices against several ministers, the paper discusses the ambiguities in the Constitution as well as the inherent weaknesses in the way each branch of government operates.This publication, through extensive literature review as well as interviews with experts, illustrates how under the current Constitution the President has significant power to enact laws and control how appointments are made to all levels of the judiciary. This has undermined both the separation and balance of power under the Constitution. The paper also points out that the judiciary has struggled to establish itself as an independent branch, both because of a weak constitutional architecture as well as a historical lack of institutional capacity within the judiciary. 

    PDF icon AREU Seperation of Powers Under the Afghan Constitution- Mar2015.pdf
  • Government of Afghanistan: Realizing Self Reliance - Commitments to Reforms & Renewed Partnership, December 2014

    President Ashraf Ghani presents his government's vision for reform and international cooperation ahead of his jointly co-hosted London Conference on Afghanistan (4th December 2014).  The Government lays out four key challenges facing Afghanistan and matches these with a series of commitments ‘intended to give credibility to the claims through immediate and near-term actions, and to trigger a longer process of reform’. 

    PDF icon REALIZING SELF-RELIANCE- FINAL Dec2.pdf
  • Samuel Hall:Social Protection System - An Afghan case study, December 2014

    UNICEF is considering the development of a social protection programme with a specific focus on children, within the already existing framework developed by the World Bank and MoLSAMD (Ministry of Labour Social Affairs, Martyrs, and Disabled). In order to support the design of this programme, and a proposed pilot, UNICEF commissioned Samuel Hall Consulting to conduct formative research in five districts to be targeted by UNICEF.  This research aims to 1. Build knowledge on child poverty and vulnerability, 2. Map existing social protection mechanisms, 3. Assess the state and vitality of zakat and awqaf institutions and 4. Develop a set of recommendations on the most appropriate modalities of interventions.

    PDF icon SH UNICEF-Social-Protection_Final.pdf
  • CSJWG: Position Paper for London Conference, November 2014

    Ahead of the London Conference on Afghanistan, the Civil Society Joint Working Group (CSJWG), a membership network of local, community and grass-roots Afghan civil society organisations, prepared the paper below.  It highlights their review of the current situation, past achievements and future needs in the following thematic sections: Democratic reform; Governance, Rule of law and Human Rights; Government revenues, Budget execution and Sub-national Governance; Economic growth and Development; Continued partnership and Aid effectiveness; the Role of civil society.  

    PDF icon Civil-society-position-paper-london-conf-23Nov2014.pdf
  • ACBAR: Transforming development beyond Transition, October 2014

    BAAG's partner in Afghanistan, ACBAR, have produced 4 thematic and 1 summary position paper for the London Conference on Afghanistan, on 4th December.  These papers reflect the progress made since their previous papers for the Tokyo conference in 2012, and highlight the continuing needs, challenges and recommendations.  Their papers are on Women's Rights, Aid Effectiveness, Service Delivery and Governance.  

    PDF icon Transforming Development Beyond Transition in Afghanistan AID EFFECTIVENESS.pdf, PDF icon Transforming Development Beyond Transition in Afghanistan GOVERNANCE.pdf, PDF icon Transforming Development Beyond Transition in Afghanistan SERVICE.pdf, PDF icon Transforming Development Beyond Transition in Afghanistan Womens Rights.pdf, PDF icon Transforming Development Beyond Transition in Afghanistan SUMMARY.pdf
  • Global Witness: Letter to President of Afghanistan regarding natural resources, October 2014

    Global Witness have long campaigned for stronger governance of Afghanistan's natural resources - seen by many as a key to the country's financial development but equally posing threats to corruption and continued insecurity.  Ahead of the London Conference on Afghanistan (4th December 2014), they wrote letters to the co-hosts, President Ashraf Ghani and Prime Minister David Cameron.  These letters explain the issues that could arise from current legislation and asks for commitment to the reform of these.  

    File 20141016 Tokyo CSO letter draft to President Ghani.docx
  • Global Witness: Letter to NATO Secretary General regarding Afghanistan's natural resources governance, August 2014

    Global Witness and a coalition of Afghan and international civil society organisations, including BAAG, have written to the NATO Secretary General calling for a focus on natural resources governance in the upcoming September NATO summit.  With the international community placing high hopes on natural resources extraction to improve Afghanistan's economy, there are concerns that the current law, approved this month by President Karzai, does not go far enough to ensure accountability and transparency, and such ommissions may provide opportunities for increased insurgent activity in the sector. 

    PDF icon Global Witness CSO NATO Letter 20140821.pdf
  • USIP: Women's Access to Justice in Afghanistan, July 2014

    This report maps how Afghan women seek justice when their rights are violated and the barriers women face in pursuing justice or receiving a fair outcome, whether in the formal system, in community-based mechanisms, or at home. Part of ongoing research and programming by the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) on how community-based approaches can improve women’s access to justice, this report is based on a time-limited ethnographic study of women’s disputes in five provinces of Afghanistan between March 2011 and January 2012.

    PDF icon USIP_Women's-Access-to-Justice-in-Afghanistan.pdf
  • Chatham House: Rebooting a Political Settlement, July 2014

    As part of their Afghanistan: Opportunity in Crisis programme, Chatham House review how the political reconciliation and peace-building process in Afghanistan is faltering.  Events of the last year - the Taliban office opening in Doha, the prisoner exchange between US soldier Bowe Bergdahl and 5 Talib inmates of Guantanamo Bay - have progressed the cause, but not to their full potential.  Meanwhile, the tactics of the international government involvement come under scrutiny. 

    PDF icon CH Rebooting a political settlement Jul14.pdf
  • AREU: Politics and Governance in Afghanistan - the Case of Nangarhar Province, June 2014

    Afghanistan’s government is often described as fragmented and fragile. However, the fact that the central government fails to function effectively in many instances, particularly beyond the capital, does not mean that there is disorder at the regional or provincial level.The first of three case studies, this paper examines the policies and programs that seek to bring the international community’s ideas of governance and service provision into being through investigating their intersections – and at times collisions – with existing power.  Looking at Nangarhar province, this research aims to look at sub-national governance and access to public goods. It seeks to understand the power relations at play, attempting to separate how government functions in reality from narratives created by the international community about how governance systems should function. 

    PDF icon AREU Politics Governance in Afg the Case of Nangarhar Province.pdf
  • Chatham House: Electoral Turnout in Afghanistan, April 2014

    Reporting on the unexpectedly high turnout by Afghans for the presidential and provincial elections, Chatham House's briefing paper paints a positive picture of the enthusiasm for democracy.  However they comment that this enthusiam is not necessarily extended to any particular candidate.  The figures also demonstrate defiance in the face of Taliban security threats and activities.  Finally, the report presents suggested roles for the international community to support a peaceful transfer of power. 

    PDF icon Chatham House Electoral Turnout Apr14.pdf
  • Afghanistan Watch: Women and Political Power in Afghanistan, March 2014

    Ahead of the 2014 Presidential elections, Afghanistan Watch presents a short fact sheet outlining current and past opportunities for Afghan women in politics.  Whilst a significant number of women hold positions in the political and judicial systems, they comment that their decision making capabilities are restricted, and that women's participation is merely 'symbolic'.   Moreover, some recent decisions could hint at possible reversal of progress made in the past decade. 

    PDF icon Afghanistan Watch Women and Political Power.pdf
  • APPRO: Implementation of the National Action Plan for Women in Afghanistan, March 2014

    This assessment by APPRO (Afghanistan Public Policy Research Organisation), commissioned by Oxfam GB, ActionAid and the Embassy of Canada in Afghanistan, investigates the gains made since implementation of the NAPWA in 2008.  Specifically it looks at pillars 2 and 3 of the NAPWA - access to justice under pillar 2 and access to education, healthcare and work under pillar 3.  Whilst the report finds little has improved in women's access to justice in the last 5 years, there is now increased access to health, education and work.  However, where quantity may have improved, quality remains a serious issue and deterrent to the full uptake of these services. 

    PDF icon APPRO Implementation of the NAPWA Assessment Mar2014.pdf

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