Civilian casualties

  • Midyear update on the protection of civilians in armed conflict: 1 January to 30 June 2018

    In the first six months of 2018, the armed conflict continued to destroy the lives and livelihoods of civilians at the same toxic levels as last year. The UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) renews its calls on parties to the conflict to increase efforts to protect the civilian population and encourages parties to work towards reaching a peaceful settlement.

    PDF icon unama_poc_midyear_update_2018_15_july_english.pdf
  • Midyear update on the protection of civilians in armed conflict: 1 January to 30 June 2018 (Dari)

    In the first six months of 2018, the armed conflict continued to destroy the lives and livelihoods of civilians at the same toxic levels as last year. The UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) renews its calls on parties to the conflict to increase efforts to protect the civilian population and encourages parties to work towards reaching a peaceful settlement.

    PDF icon unama_poc_midyear_update_2018_15_july_dari.pdf
  • Midyear update on the protection of civilians in armed conflict: 1 January to 30 June 2018 (Pashto)

    In the first six months of 2018, the armed conflict continued to destroy the lives and livelihoods of civilians at the same toxic levels as last year. The UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) renews its calls on parties to the conflict to increase efforts to protect the civilian population and encourages parties to work towards reaching a peaceful settlement.

    PDF icon unama_poc_midyear_update_2018_15_july_pashto.pdf
  • UNAMA: Mid Year Report, Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict, July 2017

    Armed conflict has continued to cause severe harm to civilians in Afghanistan. Between 1 January and 30 June 2017, UNAMA documented 5,243 civilian casualties (1,662 deaths and 3,581 injured), marking a decrease of less than one per cent in overall civilian casualties. Civilian deaths increased by two per cent while the number of civilians injured decreased by one per cent. Between 1 January 2009 and 30 June 2017, armed conflict in Afghanistan has claimed the lives of 26,512 civilians and injured 48,931 others.

    PDF icon protection_of_civilians_in_armed_conflict_midyear_report_2017_july_2017.pdf
  • UNAMA: Mid Year Report, Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict (Pashto), July 2017

    Armed conflict has continued to cause severe harm to civilians in Afghanistan. Between 1 January and 30 June 2017, UNAMA documented 5,243 civilian casualties (1,662 deaths and 3,581 injured), marking a decrease of less than one per cent in overall civilian casualties. Civilian deaths increased by two per cent while the number of civilians injured decreased by one per cent. Between 1 January 2009 and 30 June 2017, armed conflict in Afghanistan has claimed the lives of 26,512 civilians and injured 48,931 others. 

    PDF icon poc_myr_2017_executive_summary_pashto_final.pdf
  • UNAMA: Protection of civilians in armed conflict annual report 2016, February 2017

    In his press conference launching the report, the UN's Special Representative for Afghanistan, Tadamichi Yamamoto stated: 'I am deeply saddened to report, for yet another year, another increase in civilian casualties, another all-time high figure for the number of civilian casualties. In 2016 UNAMA documented 11,418 civilian casualties, an overall three per cent increase compared to the previous record-high documented in 2015.' Commenting on the tactics of anti- and pro-government forces, he continued 'The loss of life and the harm to civilians from ground fighting demands immediate action by parties to the conflict to move the fighting out of civilian populated areas.'

    PDF icon UNAMA protection_of_civilians_in_armed_conflict_annual_report_2016_feb2017.pdf
  • UNAMA: Press release on January-September 2016 civilian casualties, October 2016

    Ahead of their annual 2016 report, UNAMA released civilian casualty figures for the period January to September 2016.  Worryingly almost a quarter of these were due to activities of pro-government forces, using indiscriminate explosive weapons and aerial attacks.  The full year report is due in Janaury 2017. 

    PDF icon UNAMA civ cas report third quarter 2016.pdf
  • Emergency NGO: Brussels Conference on Afghanistan Position Paper, September 2016

    Ahead of the Brussels Conference on Afghanistan, Emergency NGO has published a position paper aimed at the Afghan government and the international community. It highlights how a context of worsening security has led to an increase in attacks on health facilities, with far-reaching negative repercussions for personnel, infrastructure and local populations. In light of this context, they call for: the set-up of local peacebuilding mechanisms, adherence to international humanitarian law, allocation of adequate financial resources to health care, revising the model of humanitarian intervention, and greater protection for humanitarian workers. 

    PDF icon Emergency BCA Position paper.pdf
  • UNAMA: Protection of civilians in armed conflict mid year report, July 2016

    5,166 civilians were recorded killed or maimed in just the first six months of 2016, of whom almost one-third were children. This represents a 4% increase on the same period in 2015, continuing the upward trend in civilian casualties in recent years. The total civilian casualty figure recorded by the UN between 1 January 2009 and 30 June 2016 has risen to 63,934, including 22,941 deaths and 40,993 injured.

    PDF icon protection_of_civilians_in_armed_conflict_midyear_report_2016_final.pdf
  • UNAMA: Annual report on the Protection of Civilians 2015, February 2016

    There is no reverse in the trend for increasing annual civilian casualty figures, as 2015 saw records broken again: 11,002 civilians injured or killed (7,457 and 3,545 respectively) is a 4% rise on 2014. Increased ground fighting in and around populated areas, along with suicide and other attacks in major cities, were the main causes of conflict-related civilian deaths and injuries in 2015. As UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein comments, “This is happening with almost complete impunity. The perpetrators of the violations, documented by UNAMA and my staff, must be held to account. And the international community should emphasise far more vigorously that the rights of civilians should be protected.”

    PDF icon unama-protection-of-civilians-annual-report-2015-final_0.pdf
  • ICC: Report on Preliminary Examination Activities, Nov. 2015

    This report summarises the preliminary examination activities conducted by the Office between Nov. 1, 2014 and Oct. 31, 2015.  Following a thorough legal assessment of the information available, the Office is analysing the admissibility of potential cases arising from the conduct of three separate groups of alleged perpetrators: members of the Taliban and their affiliates (anti-government groups); members of Afghan government forces; and members of international forces.

    PDF icon OTP-PE-rep-2015-Eng.pdf
  • International Campaign to Ban Landmines: Landmine Monitor 2015, Nov. 2015

    The report states that the proportion of casualties caused by victim activated improvised explosive devices increased significantly (to 31%, up from 22% in 2013), with the casualties in Afghanistan accounting for the majority of the increase. Afghanistan experienced the greatest single rise in casualties, with 1,296 recorded in 2014 compared to 1,050 in 2013. The bulk of the increase was due to victim-activated improvised explosive devices, with 809 recorded in 2014 compared to 567 in 2013. There were 561 child casualties in Afghanistan in 2014, representing nearly half (46%) of all civilian casualties in that country where the age was known.  Support to mine action activities in Afghanistan dropped considerably, from $67.5 million in 2013 to $49.3 million in 2014.  

    PDF icon Landmine-Monitor-2015_finalpdf.pdf
  • UNAMA: Mid Year Report, Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict, August 2015

    The Afghan conflict continued to exact a heavy toll on Afghan civilians in the first six months of 2015, with civilian casualties projected to equal or exceed the record high numbers documented in 2014. UNAMA’s 2015 Midyear Report on Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict documented 4,921 civilian casualties (1,592 deaths and 3,329 injured) in the first half of 2015, a one per cent increase in total civilian casualties compared to the same period in 2014.  The vast majority – or 90% – of civilian casualties resulted from ground engagements, improvised explosive devices, complex and suicide attacks and targeted killings.

    PDF icon UNAMA Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict Midyear Report 2015.pdf
  • Report of the Secretary General on children and armed conflict, May 2015

    The UN's annual report covers the period 1st September 2010 to 31st December 2014. It quickly states that "More children were killed or maimed in 2014 than in any previous year under review. Children continue to be recruited and used for various purposes, including as suicide bombers, abducted and deprived of their right to education and health care." The report covers the 6 grave violations against children of the MRM (Monitoring & Reporting Mechanism).  It also provides recommendations to prevent and end grave violations against children in Afghanistan and to improve measures for their protection. 

    File Report SG on children armed conflict May15.docx
  • UNAMA: 2014 Annual Report, Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict, February 2015

    UNAMA documented 10,548 civilian casualties in 2014, the highest number recorded in a single year since 2009. For the first time since 2009, more Afghan civilians were killed and injured in ground engagements than by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) or any other tactic.  These ground engagements increasingly used explosive weapons systems such as mortars, rockets and grenades, sometimes indiscriminately, in civilian-populated areas - leading to devastating consequences for civilians.

    PDF icon UNAMA Protection-of-Civilians-annual report 2014.pdf

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