Development

  • State of the world’s emergencies: A briefing for UK parliamentarians, October 2017

    This briefing has been put together by a significant number of international non-governmental organisations (NGOs) under the leadership of Bond’s Humanitarian and Conflict Policy groups. These NGOs are either actively operational in these contexts or working to raise awareness in the UK of the challenges faced by people experiencing humanitarian disasters, conflict and upheaval. Afghanistan is featured in a section of this report where it describes its fragility and its need for continuos international support. 

    PDF icon bond_state_of_the_worlds_emergencies_2017.pdf
  • AREU: Judicial Review in Afghanistan: A Flawed Practice, August 2017

    This report explores judicial review in Afghanistan. Judicial review is an important practice where a court or a similar institution reviews and decides on the constitutionality of laws and public acts.  Constitutional review was embraced by Afghanistan’s post-conflict Constitution of 2004, and the Supreme Court and the Independent Commission for Overseeing the Implementation of the Constitution (ICOIC) were empowered to ensure the constitutionality of legislation and public actions respectively. In Afghanistan, judicial review has remained broad and imprecise in the text of the constitution, it also proved a difficult practice to institutionalise, as neither institution granted these new powers had ever exercised judicial review. A number of case studies demonstrate the Supreme Court’s inconsistency while conducting judicial review.

    PDF icon AREU__Judicial-Review-in-Afghanistan__English_Print_covers.pdf
  • AREU: Evolution of the Executive Branch in Afghanistan: A Look Back and Recommendations on the Way Forward, August 2017

    The findings of this report illustrate that legitimate change in the political system of Afghanistan will require an amended Constitution. The authority to amend the Constitution of Afghanistan has been given to the Loya Jirga in the Constitution. The majority of experts interviewed recognized that in the present situation, there are significant obstacles to convening a Loya Jirga. As a legal matter, it is unlikely that a Loya Jirga could be convened under the Constitution, because firstly Afghanistan has not held District Council elections; and secondly as some of the Experts point out, the legitimacy of the current Parliament is also in question. All but one of the Experts also considered the social, political and security obstacles to convening a Loya Jirga. In particular, some Experts fear that ethnic issues may predominate, leading to the Loya Jirga spending more time debating identity and language issues than it would addressing the structure of the government.

    PDF icon AREU__Executive-Review-in-Afghanistan__English_print_covers.pdf
  • DFID Afghanistan Profile: July 2017

    This report is a profile created by DFID on Afghanistan. It explores issues such as why DFID has invested in Afghanistan, what the aid expects to achieve looking ahead, and other relavant issues pertainig to DFID's work in Afghanistan.

    PDF icon Policy paper-DFID Afghanistan Profile-July 2017.pdf
  • Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF) Study Report

    This report is by the Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU) which has released the findings of an in‐depth Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF) study designed to assist policymakers in promoting policies based on evidence‐based research and address some of Afghanistan’s most pressing land ownership issues.  

    PDF icon Land-Governance-Assessment-Framework-LGAF-Afghanistan.pdf
  • Aid in a Conflict Zone: Can military and development objectives work together?

    This report presents the main points raised in a panel discussion which examined devolopment cooperation and civil-military relations in Afghanistan. 

    PDF icon BAAG_ConflictZone_Final.pdf
  • Understanding the impact of illicit economies in Afghanistan's Development

    A summary report of the APPG Afghanistan briefing and discussion on the role illicit economies play in Afghanistan's development. Core themes include the drug economy, mining, and migration.

    PDF icon BAAG_IllicitEconom_Final.pdf
  • SCA: Afghanistan's Road to Self-Reliance, March 2017

    The Swedish Committee for Afghanistan, an INGO present in Afghanistan for decades, convened a conference in December 2016 to consider lessons learnt in security and development efforts. Incorporating offical reviews by the Danish and Norwegian governments of their interventions, and bringing Afghan development and rights actors to the stage, the conference explored civil-military lessons, as well as development and diplomacy interventions. This report captures the rich discussions and asks what better approaches might be considered going forwards.  

    PDF icon sca2016internationalconference_finalversion.pdf
  • Brussels Conference on Afghanistan: communique of participants, October 2016

    On 5 October 2016, the 75 countries and 26 international organisations participating in the Brussels Conference on Afghanistan on 5 October 2016 issued a communiqué, renewing the partnership for prosperity and peace between the National Unity Government of Afghanistan and the international community. They underlined  their collective commitment to deepen and strengthen their cooperation to achieve Afghanistan's self-reliance in the transformation decade (2015-2024) and to create a political, social and economic environment that will allow Afghanistan to consolidate peace, security, sustainable development and prosperity. They noted that important progress has been achieved on Afghanistan's way to a functioning, accountable and increasingly sustainable state, but the substantial challenges that the country still faces require further efforts to safeguard and build on these joint achievements. 

    PDF icon BCA final communique.pdf
  • SCA: Experience on civilian-military interaction & consequences of the military intervention on aid delivery,

    Ahead of the Swedish government's evaluation of its engagement in Afghanistan, the Swedish Committee for Afghanistan conducted research into an area of particular concern for them, civil-military cooperation. This minor qualitative interview-based study aims to give input to various questions around the impact of international military presence and actions on development initiatives.

    Beyond Incidents; SCA's Experience on Civilian-Military Interaction and Consequences of Military Intervention on Aid Delivery
  • SCA: Perspective of the SCA to the Inquiry on Sweden's engagement in Afghanistan, March 2016

    As with other countries, Sweden has conducted an evaluation of its intervention in Afghanistan from the period 2001-14.  The Swedish Committee for Afghanistan provided the following report, presenting their perspective on the contributions made both by their own programmes and the state of Sweden.  The report is based on their own internal reports and minutes and external op-eds, articles and other communications. 

    Concerning the Swedish and International Operations in Afghanistan 2001–2014: An SCA Perspective
  • Report of the UN Secretary General to the Security Council, March 2016

    Deteriorating security and an increasingly vocal political opposition placed increased pressure on the Government of Afghanistan, despite steps towards a possible peace process. The announcement of 15 October 2016 for parliamentary and district council elections brought renewed demands for electoral reforms. The Afghan National Defence and Security Forces continued to face significant challenges in effectively countering the threats of insurgent groups across the country. The Government of Afghanistan took steps to further its economic reform agenda in the context of persistent slow economic growth and emigration, and began preparations for the ministerial-level development conference in Brussels.

    PDF icon sg-report-7march2016.pdf
  • BAAG: Migration & Development - The Case of Afghanistan, February 2016

    As part of our Media4Development programme, BAAG organised a policy-makers and development practitioners roundtable. The BAAG and RUSI Roundtable explored the causes of Afghan migration and asked why development efforts in Afghanistan are failing the Afghan people. Moreover, it raised the question of whether development aid is an appropriate tool for reducing migration and extremism and what are its limits? The report presents the main discussion points and recommendations. 

    PDF icon BAAG_ReportFeb2016_FInal.pdf
  • USIP: What can be done to revive Afghanistan's economy?, February 2016

    Reviving the Afghan economy during a time of intensifying violent conflict, declining external financial aid, and ongoing political uncertainty and dysfunction will be extremely challenging. But the country cannot wait for these entrenched problems to be addressed. While keeping expectations modest, this report proposes some targeted, near-term measures to increase confidence and stimulate the economy. 

    PDF icon USIP-What-Can-Be-Done-to-Revive-Afghanistans-Economy Feb16.pdf
  • Government of Afghanistan: State of Afghan Cities report 2015, February 2016

    The population of Afghan cities is expected to double within the next 15 years and by 2060, one in every two Afghans will be living in cities. In order to manage such a transition accurate data and information is essential.This report provides the first-ever assessment of the conditions in all of Afghanistan’s 34 Provincial Capitals, home to over 8 million people. It shows that Afghan cities are a driving force of social and economic development, state-building and peace-building, yet their full potential has been constrained by the absence of an effective urban policy and regulatory framework, insufficient and poorly coordinated investment, and weak municipal governance and land management.Volume One is a narrative report highlighting key issues including municipal governance, the urban economy, access to land and housing and the urban environment. Volume Two contains maps and data for all 34 Provincial Capitals.

    PDF icon GIROA State of Afghan Cities 2015 Volume_1.pdf, PDF icon GIROA State of Afghan Cities 2015 Volume_2.pdf

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