Development

  • AREU: The Political Economy of Education & Health Service Delivery, February 2016

    Political settlements affect service delivery in Afghanistan, according to this AREU research study examining the health and education sectors of Afghanistan. This study tested the hypothesis that the character of political settlements at various levels (primary, secondary, and sectoral) may partly explain the varying delivery outcomes across the country. The study first assesses interference with service delivery by insurgents and local strongmen, finding largely affirmative responses in this respect, and then examines the variations in secondary settlements in the three provincial case studies. Finally, the study explores how local elites and government officials attempt to manage and control service delivery for their own ends.

    PDF icon AREU The Political Economy of Education and Health Service Delivery in Afghanistan.pdf
  • AREU: The other side of gender inequality - Men & masculinities in Afghanistan, January 2016

    As raised in our own Getting it Right gender event/report, failure to understand masculinity and male perceptions is likely to undermine gender-focused programme approaches in Afghanistan. This new study by Afghanistan Research & Evaluation Unit argues that even though masculinity is a significant gender studies issue, the term “gender” for Afghans is connected almost exclusively with women, leading to men’s resistance towards messages interpreted solely as “women’s issues”.The aim for this research is to explain how men’s attitudes, perceptions and actions are influenced by socio-culturally constructed ideas of manhood, and how these factors further affect the interaction between men and women in Afghan communities. The paper strives to address the issues connecting the notions of “manhood” to violence against women, as well as the degree in which men tend to claim the “control” over women’s life and their decisions. 

    PDF icon AREU The Other Side of Gender Inequality- Men and Masculinities in Afghanistan.pdf
  • AREU: Household Water Insecurity, December 2015

    Some recent WHO/UNICEF reports have indicated that the MDG for access to safe drinking water has been achieved in Afghanistan, far ahead of schedule. This discussion paper by AREU  suggests that such claims should be taken with great caution. The paper identifies a number of issues regarding how progress towards the MDG on ‘sustainable access to safe drinking water’ has been established for Afghanistan. These issues include inflated data (as found in influential reports from the WHO/UNICEF), methodological discrepancies between different national surveys, biased trend assessments, and unrealistic assumptions about the long-term sustainability of existing water systems.Based on the key points brought to light, the paper suggests a number of policy recommendations.

    PDF icon AREU Household Water Insecurity.pdf
  • Bond: What Development Means to Diaspora Communities, Nov. 2015

    This report examines the relationship between Diaspora communities and INGOs. The report states that both Diaspora communities and INGOs want to create positive change in developing countries, but their priorities, strategies and ways of working differ substantively. The report also notes that given their different approaches, they often operate in parallel to each other, with few regular opportunities to interact and collaborate. Communication and engagement have to be planned endeavours that take up resources and require capacity. Diasporas tend to lack trust in INGOs and their effectiveness. Moreover, the language and images used by INGOs often lead to mistrust, frustration and a sense of disconnection. Many Diaspora communities believe that INGOs perpetuate negative stereotypes and oversimplify the serious issues that affect the lives of their families and friends in their countries of origin. The report also makes recommendations on how to improve this relationship between Diaspora communities and INGOs.                                                                                               

    PDF icon what-development-means-to-diaspora-communities-1115.pdf
  • Senior Officials Meeting: Co-Chairs Statement, September 2015

    The Second Senior Officials Meeting (SOM) was held in Kabul on 5th September 2015.  Co-chaired by the Afghan Minister of Finance and the UN Special Representative, the meeting was attended by delegations from 41 countries and 11 international organisations.  The meeting followed the London Conference on Afghanistan in December 2014 and provided a forum for discussing key development needs and plans. A new framework to replace the Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework (TMAF) was drafted in advance and discussed in the meeting - called the Self-reliance through Mutual Accountability Framework (SMAF).  This statement reflects on the SOM discussions and commitments. 

    PDF icon 20150905 Senior Officials Meeting Co-Chairs' Statement.pdf
  • Government of Afghanistan: Self-reliance through Mutual Accountability Framework, September 2015

    At the Senior Officials Meeting in Kabul on September 5th, the Afghan government and international community agreed a new partnership framework, the SMAF.  This replaces the Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework, agreed and adopted in July 2012.  The SMAF poses the activities and developments for both parties in Afghanistan's journey to stability and self-reliance. Six areas of attention are posed: 1: Improving Security and Political Stability; 2: Anti-corruption, Governance, Rule of Law, and human rights; 3: Restoring Fiscal Sustainability & Integrity of Public Finance and Commercial Banking; 4: Reforming Development Planning and Management & Ensuring Citizen’s Development Rights; 5: Private Sector Development and Inclusive growth and development; 6: Development Partnerships and Aid Effectiveness

    PDF icon SMAF MAIN with annex 3 sep 2015.pdf
  • BAAG: Aiding Fragile States, July 2015

    As part of their Media4Development programme, BAAG organised a policy-makers and development practitioners roundtable. It aimed to explore the challenges of development in Afghanistan and the relevance of the New Deal for Engagement in Fragile States framework in the country.  Moreover, it raised the question of how the development community (donors & NGOs) and the media can improve public communications about the complexities (and sometimes failures) of development in fragile states.  The report presents the main discussion points and recommendations. 

    PDF icon BAAG_RoundtableReport_WEB.pdf
  • BAAG: Policy position paper on Service Delivery, July 2015

    Following the General Election in May 2015, BAAG and its members prepared a briefing pack for MPs and ministers.  These covered the themes of Governance, Human Rights, Service Delivery, Women's Rights and Humanitarian.  They each present an overview of the progress and remaining challenges in each area, and priority recommendations for the British government to consider in its support to Afghanistan. 

    PDF icon Policy Position Paper - Service Delivery final version 22July15.pdf
  • Fund for Peace: Fragile States Index 2015, June 2015

    The Fragile States Index, produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure.  It is an annual ranking of 178 nations based on their levels of stability and the pressures they face. Afghanistan remains a High Alert fragile state in 2015, with a worsening trend in the decade 2006-15.  However during 2014 specifically, it's state did not worsen significantly, and thus it is not reported on specifically within this report. 

    PDF icon fragilestatesindex-2015.pdf
  • AREU: Mapping village variability in Afghanistan, May 2015

    This research and policy briefing focuses on the variability of village ‘behaviour’ and whether or not this can be characterised more systematically in order to guide programming according to context and to account for villages’ development experience.  Much of the programming in Afghanistan since 2001 is designed to bring about changes in village-level government. However, it has rarely, if ever, taken into account pre-existing structures used by villages to organize and manage their affairs. Rather, it has been assumed that there is a landscape of identical villages with few legacies from the past, and that new interventions to reorder village government would simply displace what was there before.

    PDF icon AREU Mapping village variability in Afghanistan.pdf, PDF icon AREU Taking village context into account in Afghanistan.pdf
  • Mercy Corps: Youth & Consequences - Unemployment, Injustice & Violence, April 2015

    Mercy Corps' report tackles some of the most persistent assumptions driving youth programming in fragile states. Drawing on interviews and surveys with youth in Afghanistan, Colombia and Somalia, the report finds the principal drivers of political violence are rooted not in poverty, but in experiences of injustice: discrimination, corruption and abuse by security forces.  In light of these findings, many familiar approaches — vocational training programmes, for instance, and civic engagement — are unlikely, in isolation, to have much effect on stability. A new approach is required, one that tackles the sources of instability, not just the symptoms.

    PDF icon MercyCorps_YouthConsequencesReport_2015.pdf
  • BAAG: Monthly report, April 2015

    BAAG's monthly 2-sided review of the key news from Afghanistan, which for April included progress in the appointment of Cabinet positions, a bloody start to the Taliban's spring offensive, a deadly landslide in Badakhshan and concerns over the continued targetting of minority groups.

    PDF icon Afghanistan in April.pdf
  • AREU: The A to Z Guide to Assistance in Afghanistan 13th edition, March 2015

    AREU's annual A to Z Guide aims to 'enhance understanding of the dizzying array of actors,  structures and  government processes related to aid and reconstruction efforts in the country.'  The guide provide an extensive glossary of assistance terms, an overview of Afghanistan’s system of government, key primary documents, and an extensive contact directory that includes government agencies, NGOs, donors and international actors. The new edition offers: new entries on  research organisations and libraries; political overview of all 34 provinces presenting key figures such as seats in Parliament, number of districts and their population; an extensive contacts directory that includes government agencies, NGOs, and international agencies.

    PDF icon AREU A to Z Guide to Assistance in Afghanistan 2015.pdf
  • UNAMA: The Stolen Lands of Afghanistan & its People, March 2015

    The second in a series of three reports UNAMA's report focuses on how state lands are distributed. This paper is the result of a desktop review and joint research by the UNAMA Rule of Law Unit (RoL) and the Civil Affairs Unit (CAU) in seven provinces—Kabul, Nangarhar, Kunduz, Balkh, Herat, Gardez, and Kandahar.This report identifies, assesses, and compares the legal framework and existing land distribution practices, and proposes specific recommendations to address overarching challenges to this system.

    PDF icon UNAMA_State_Land_Distribution_System_March15.pdf
  • Development Initiatives: An Act of Faith - humanitarian financing & Zakat, March 2015

    Discussions abound regarding the increasing scale of humanitarian crises and the financing gaps these face. One potentially significant area of charitable giving that has received relatively little attention in discussions on the current humanitarian financing crisis is faith-based giving, and Islamic financing in particular. An Act of Faith explores the purpose, scale and potential of Zakat – one of the main tools of Islamic social financing – for financing humanitarian response. It provides a basis on which to open up discussions around how that potential might be maximised – both by increasing the overall volume of Zakat collected (rather than redirecting existing funds) and improving the mechanisms available to channel Zakat to the humanitarian response.

    PDF icon DevInt-Zakat_report_V9a.pdf, PDF icon Zakat beneficiaries.pdf

Pages