Development

  • ICAI: DFID's Bilateral Support to Growth & Livelihoods in Afghanistan, March 2014

    The Independent Commission for Aid Impact (ICAI) reviewed 5 of DFID's growth and livelihoods programmes, totalling £97.8 million from 2006-2018.  Whilst their fieldwork indicated positive differences being made to beneficiaries, they were unclear how such impacts in the long term can be sustained.  Given the political, military and economic transitions of 2014, ICAI comment that 'DFID faces a challenge to ensure that its future growth and livelihoods portfolio is sufficiently coherent and flexible, given an increasingly uncertain future.'  These issues are faced by most international NGOs and donors and ICAI's recommendations are relevant to us all. 

    PDF icon ICAI-Report-DFID’s-Bilateral-Support-to-Growth-and-Livelihoods-in-Afghanistan.pdf
  • Islamic Relief: Afghanistan in Limbo, March 2014

    Islamic Relief's report raises their concerns that significant aid cuts - both those realised recently and anticipated - could derail the progress made in Afghanistan in the last decade.  The report points out that aid has fallen from $894 million in 2011 to $508 million in 2013, and less than a fifth of the UN’s humanitarian plan for 2014 has been funded so far. The UK’s contribution to the international aid effort has dropped from an average of $296m per year from 2009 to 2011, to a pledged $178m a year from 2012 to 2017.Islamic Relief argues that rather than cut aid, the international community should maintain aid levels and concentrate on improving aid effectiveness.

    PDF icon Afghanistan in Limbo Islamic Relief Mar14.pdf
  • BAAG: Understanding Gender Programming & Issues in Afghanistan, March 2014

    BAAG's briefing paper was drafted ahead of our Getting it Right Gender Conference, held in London on March 26th & 27th.  It summarises key points raised during BAAG's earlier gender programme activities, including discussions by 4 leading Gender specialists on programme successes and challenges (held in May 2013) and points raised  during a week of discussions on violence against women & girls (VAWG) by 3 leading Afghan women's rights activitists (held in July 2013).The paper includes comments on the increased need for men and boys to be included in women's rights programming, the need for experienced and specialist staff to design and run gender programmes and the dangers of inconsistent gender policies within the donor community. 

    PDF icon BAAG Briefing Note_Understanding Gender_FINAL.pdf
  • BAAG: Transition and Non-Government Organizations in Afghanistan, January 2014

    BAAG, in partnership with ENNA (European Network of NGOs in Afghanistan) and APPRO (Afghanistan Public Policy Research Organization), surveyed various NGOs operating in Afghanistan in mid-late 2013.  This research reveals their concerns and recommendations on the various scenarios which could result from the security, political and financial transitions of 2014.  Whilst all surveyed NGOs are firmly committed to continuing their programmes in Afghanistan, there are various complex issues they and their donors must address. 

    PDF icon NGOs in Transition.pdf
  • Samuel Hall: “A Study of Poverty, Food Security and Resilience in Afghan Cities, 2014

    This study was funded by the European Union and conducted by Samuel Hall, DRC (Danish Refugee Council) and PIN (People in Need). It provides new insights into the nature, level and complexity of poverty, food security and resilience issues among urban households in Afghanistan. It compares the experiences of host communities, IDPs and returnees across the five major Afghan cities and provides evidence-based recommendations for practical action and policy reform to more effectively address urban poverty.

    PDF icon SH DRC-PIN-Urban-Poverty-Report.pdf
  • TMAF: Report of the Special Joint Coordination & Monitoring Board Meeting, January 2014

    After the Senior Officials Meeting in July 2013, there followed a JCMB meeting in January 2014 to review progress against the six areas of commitment for the Government of Afghanistan and international community outlined in the TMAF (Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework) of 2012.  This report highlights progress to date and challenges remaining.  A Dari version is provided in our 'Reports in Dari' section.

    PDF icon JCMB Joint Report English-Final Version.pdf
  • TMAF: Report of the Special Joint Coordination & Monitoring Board Meeting (Dari), January 2014

    After the Senior Officials Meeting in July 2013, there followed a JCMB meeting in January 2014 to review progress against the six areas of commitment for the Government of Afghanistan and international community outlined in the TMAF (Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework) of 2012.  This report highlights progress to date and challenges remaining.  An English version is provided in the 'Development' section. 

    PDF icon JCMB Joint Report Dari-Final Version.pdf
  • Ministry of Economy: Millennium Development Goals report 2012, December 2013

    The Afghan Ministry of Economy reports on the progress of Afghanistan towards the 2015 MDGs.  Afghanistan adopted the MDGs in 2004, 5 years after their declaration. This is their 4th progress report. 

    PDF icon Afghanistan MDGs 2012 Report.pdf
  • BAAG: Sustainable Engagement to 2014 & beyond, November 2013

    BAAG and Chatham House convened a panel of experts on Afghanistan to consider various scenarios the country may face in 2014 and beyond.  Topics included the presidential election process, improving governance, and the role of civil society.  Overall, the panel felt a middle ground, cautiously optimistic scenario was most likely, and discussions indicated the increasingly loud voice of a nation who are demanding progress from their government.  

    PDF icon BAAG Chatham House Sustainable Engagement Nov 13.pdf
  • TMAF: July 2013 Senior Officials Meeting, September 2013

    Held on 3 July 2013 in Kabul, the Senior Officials Meeting (SOM) was convened almost a year after the July 2012 Tokyo Conference, in which the Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework (TMAF) was established, to cofirm the commitments of the international community and the Government of Afghanistan in the move from Afghanistan's transition to transformation.  The SOM served as a 1 year follow-up mechanism, to review progress on the principles of the TMAF. The Meeting was co-chaired by the Ministers of Foreign Affairs and Finance and the Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary General to Afghanistan. Delegations from 40 countries and 8 international agencies in addition to Ministers and senior officials of the Afghan Government and representatives of Afghan civil society and private sector attended the SOM. The meeting revealed progress in some areas yet continued efforts and commitment required in others.   

    PDF icon SOM FINAL Report 02 July 2013.pdf
  • HPG/ODI: The Search for Common Ground, April 2013

    Through a series of case studies and other exchanges, this project aims to provide contextual analysis of how civil–military coordination mechanisms have functioned in disaster and conflict contexts in Afghanistan from 2002- 2013. Of key concern is what impact civil–military coordination mechanisms have had on the efficiency or effectiveness of humanitarian response, and on outcomes for affected populations.

    PDF icon The Search for Common Ground April 2013.pdf
  • Water Governance Models in Afghanistan: Filling the Gap

    This paper examines the necessity for water governance and resource management. The author states that Afghanistan is not a 'blank slate' as the international community believes, but that it must adapt to the institutional norms already in place.

    PDF icon Water Governance Models in Afghanistan March 2013.pdf
  • World Bank: Afghanistan in Transition: Looking Beyond 2014, May 2012

     This report explores the ramifications which transition -the withdrawal of most international troops by 2014 - will have on Afghanistan's economic and development fabric.  It points out that the decline in external assistance will have widespread repercussions for Afghanistan’s political and economic landscape well beyond 2014..

    PDF icon World Bank Afghanistan in Transition May 2012.pdf
  • ODI: Talking to the Other Side, December 2012

    The first substantive research of its kind into aid access, this report and policy brief by the Overseas Development Institute examines how aid agencies engage with the Taliban to gain access to Afghans in need of assistance. Compiled after almost 150 interviews with Afghans, aid agencies, the Taliban and diplomats, it offers a series of recommendations on humanitarian negotiations.

    PDF icon ODI Talking to the other side Full Report.pdf, PDF icon ODI Talking to the other side Policy Brief.pdf
  • IDC: Afghanistan: Development, progress and prospects after 2014, October 2012

    The UK Parliament's International Development Committee recommends that the British government revise its aid priorities in Afghanistan, giving greater emphasis to humanitarian aid, providing basic services and alleviating poverty.The report, released in October 2012, called for more to be done to meet the needs of vulnerable Afghan communities as international forces prepare to leave the country.It recommends that the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) reconsider its current policy of trying to build a “viable state” in Afghanistan and instead give higher priority to humanitarian and development projects.

    PDF icon Afghanistan Development, progress and prospects after 2014 Oct. 2012.pdf

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