Refugees & IDPs

  • UNHCR: This is who we are, October 2016

    Amidst the unprecedented numbers of refugees and migrants arriving in Europe in 2015 there was also a high number of unaccompanied and separated children (UASC). More than half of these were Afghan nationals.This study was conducted in collaboration with the Swedish Migration Agency. It aims to provide an overview of who these Afghan UASC are, what made them decide to undertake such a long and difficult journey, what happened along the way, and why they ultimately chose Sweden as their destination.While UASC leaving from Afghanistan stated security-related reasons, including conflict and violence, as their primary reason for leaving, UASC leaving from Iran primarily referred to discrimination and lack of documentation. Economic reasons were only mentioned by a small fraction of all UASC interviewed. They reported experiencing acute distress and severe protection incidents in Iran, Turkey and throughout the Balkan route. 

    PDF icon UNHCR ThisIsWhoWeAre.pdf
  • UNICEF: Humanitarian Sit Rep 3, October 2016

    Since OCHA launched its Returnees Flash Appeal in September, Unicef and other agencies have been responding to the staggering number of Afghans crossing back into the country from Pakistan, Iran and further afield. By early October, there are 7,400 people crossing the border every day.  Many require health and nutrition support, whilst education and child protection interventions are also a priority. 

    PDF icon UNICEF Afghanistan Humanitarian Situation Report #3 - 12 October 2016.pdf
  • OCHA: Flash Appeal - One Million People on the Move, September 2016

    With over 5,000 displaced Afghans returning from Pakistan each day in recent weeks, UN OCHA has launched an emergency flash appeal for funds to respond to this growing humanitarian crisis. The humanitarian impact of prolonged conflict in Afghanistan is severe. More than 1.1 million people have been displaced from their homes by the conflict, including more than 245,000 people since the beginning of 2016. As the conflict ensues, humanitarian needs are increasing and access constraints have escalated. Meanwhile political decisions in Pakistan have seen many Afghan refugees forced to return at unprecedented rates. 

    PDF icon OCHA afg_2016_flash_appeal_web.pdf
  • IRC: Afghan refugees and the European refugee crisis, July 2016

    Afghan refugees make up 21% of the over 1 million refugees who have fled to Europe since January 2015, fleeing a country with a worsening security situation and few prospects for its people. This briefing focuses on Afghan refugees and the European Refugee Crisis, and the continued conflict in the country from which they fled. In the briefing the IRC calls for action in four areas:1. Ensure a fair, thorough and effective asylum process for all nationalities2. Expand relocation to Afghans and accelerate family unity transfers from Greece to other EU countries3. Ensure Afghans and other non-Syrians in Turkey have meaningful access to temporary protection4. Commit to an expanded resettlement programme and safe alternative pathways into Europe

    PDF icon IRC European Refugee Crisis - Afghanistan briefing final (1).pdf
  • UNHCR: Global Trends Forced Migration report 2015, June 2016

    UNHCR's annual global report paints a bleak and shocking picture - by the end of 2015, one in 113 people was a refugee, displaced or an asylum seeker. Afghanistan continues to be the second largest country of origin, behind Syria. But 2015 saw increased voluntary returns of refugees, particularly to Afghanistan - yet this is a drop in the ocean.  Afghanistan also saw a large number of new internally displaced people in 2015 (492,600). 

    PDF icon UNHCR-Global-Trends-2015.pdf
  • CIDOB: The voices behind the refugee outflow from Afghanistan, June 2016

    The current narrative in the West explaining why Afghans are leaving is media-centric and misleading. Media commentary and the social media frenzy make little mention of the real voices of those Afghans who are leaving, often opting for a life of uncertainty in hopes of obtaining a refugee status in Western countries. Is leaving an easy decision? What factors are considered in choosing the target destination? How are the deteriorating socioeconomic conditions in the region affecting Afghans’ choice to leave their country? CIDOB (Barcelona Centre for International Affairs) conducted semi-structured interviews with a number of Afghans, independent experts and researchers, during the period from January to April 2016.

    PDF icon CIDOB Voices behind Refugees Jun16.pdf
  • Samuel Hall: Urban Displaced Youth in Kabul - Mental Health Matters, June 2016

    Youth and their households may not be well versed in the requirements of Afghan cities. They may not have the contacts or networks to secure jobs. As this three-part study reveals, youth mainly turn to community leaders and religious leaders for advice, as they consider their parents ill-equipped to support them. This study reveals the invisible trauma of conflict on the young generation, the geographic boundaries and borders within a city that divides neighbourhoods and limits options offered to youth, the marginalization and isolation of the displaced youth in particular who suffer from mental health needs that are now increasingly being voiced, and the rise of criminality and urban insecurity that make all – especially female youth – insecure.

    PDF icon Samuel Hall UDY-Chapter-1-Mental-Health.pdf
  • Amnesty International: "My children will die this winter", May 2016

    Amnesty International calls on the Afghan government and the international community to do much more in tackling the country's growing displacement crisis. In just three years, the number of people who have been forced to flee their homes due to war has more than doubled to 1.2 million, with an average of nearly 1,000 newly displaced people per day in the first four months of 2016 alone. Displaced communities often find themselves living in squalid conditions, with minimal access to adequate housing, food, education or healthcare. The implementation of the government's 2014 IDP Policy has thus far failed to make any significant impact, mostly due to a lack of political will and capacity. 

    PDF icon AI My children will die this winter May16.PDF
  • AAN: We knew they had no future in Kabul, April 2016

    This study by Afghanitan Analysts Network and FES explores the reasons behind Afghanistan’s increased migration, by focusing on the discussions and decisions at the household level. Afghans are now the second largest group entering the European Union.There are clear information and knowledge gaps on the reasons behind the current, increased levels of Afghan migration. For this reason, this brief study aimed to explore the decision-making processes at the family level of a small number of migrants. It consisted of 12 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with selected Afghan households from which one or more members left for Europe in 2015.  

    PDF icon AAN-Migration-IVs-paper-Engl. Apr2016pdf.pdf
  • Refugee Support Network: After Return - documenting the experiences of young people forcibly removed to Afghanistan, April 2016

    2,018 young men who spent their formative teenage years in the UK care system have been sent back to Afghanistan over the past 9 years, often to very precarious and dangerous situations. Since March 2014, the Refugee Support Network has been systematically monitoring what happens to former child asylum seekers who have been forcibly removed to Afghanistan after turning 18. After Return documents their experiences and, for the first time, fills a vital evidence gap in their education, employment, health, and wellbeing outcomes.  

    PDF icon After Return_RSN_April 2016.pdf
  • BAAG: Migration & Development - The Case of Afghanistan, February 2016

    As part of our Media4Development programme, BAAG organised a policy-makers and development practitioners roundtable. The BAAG and RUSI Roundtable explored the causes of Afghan migration and asked why development efforts in Afghanistan are failing the Afghan people. Moreover, it raised the question of whether development aid is an appropriate tool for reducing migration and extremism and what are its limits? The report presents the main discussion points and recommendations. 

    PDF icon BAAG_ReportFeb2016_FInal.pdf
  • UNHCR: Mid Year Trends 2015, December 2015

    With almost a million people having crossed the Mediterranean as refugees and migrants so far in 2015, and conflicts in Syria, Afghanistan and elsewhere continuing to generate staggering levels of human suffering, 2015 is likely to exceed all previous records for global forced displacement, UNHCR warn this report. Covering the period from January to end June, the report looks at worldwide displacement resulting from conflict and persecution. The global refugee total, which a year ago was 19.5 million, had as of mid-2015 passed the 20 million threshold (20.2 million) for the first time since 1992. Asylum applications were meanwhile up 78 per cent (993,600) over the same period in 2014. And the numbers of internally displaced people jumped by around 2 million to an estimated 34 million.

    PDF icon UNHRC 2015-12-18_MY displacement.pdf
  • HRW: “What Are You Doing Here?” Police Abuses Against Afghans in Pakistan, Nov. 2015

    Hostility towards Afghans living in Pakistan is not new, but it increased dramatically after the so-called Pakistani Taliban, Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan, attacked the Army Public School in Peshawar on December 16, 2014, killing 145 people, including 132 children. Since then, Pakistani police have carried out raids on Afghan settlements, detained, harassed, and beaten Afghan men, extorted bribes, and demolished Afghan homes. Every Afghan interviewed by Human Rights Watch who had returned to Afghanistan said that fear of the police was the reason they had done so. Afghans remaining in Pakistan described a repeated pattern of arbitrary detention, extortion, and intimidation. Both registered and undocumented Afghans have been the victims of Pakistani police abuse.

    PDF icon pakistan1115_4up.pdf
  • OCHA: Humanitarian Response Plan Mid Year Review, August 2015

    OCHA - the UN's Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs - review the humanitarian situation against their 2015 plan, highlighting increased conflict-related casualties and displacements (both of Afghans and Pakistani refugees escaping prolonged military operations in North Waziristan). In 2015 so far, 103,000 people have been displaced and 107,000 affected by natural disasters.  Yet response levels vary, with many far below their targets (WASH activities have reached only 23% of their target 1.9 million people). Only 38% of the funding required for all response activities has so far been received.  

    PDF icon OCHA 2015 mid year review.pdf
  • OCHA: Humanitarian Bulletin, July 2015

    This report focusses on the needs of IDPs and returnees, since numbers of returnees into eastern Afghanistan for the first 6 months of 2015 already exceeds the total number recorded in 2014. The unprecedented rate of return is overwhelming the capacity of humanitarian actors to assist returning populations.  The bulletin also highlights an upcoming Samuel Hall study which finds that returnees are comparatively less vulnerable compared to internally displaced persons.

    PDF icon OCHA-June2015-Humanitarian-Bulletin.pdf

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