Transition

  • Development Initiatives: Afghanistan beyond 2014, Aid & the Transformation Decade, November 2014

    Afghanistan has been the focus of large international aid and security investments since the US-led military intervention of 2001. There have been many major milestones for Afghanistan in 2014, and the country is now on the cusp of what has been termed the ‘Transformation Decade’ spanning from 2015 to 2024. This period of transition brings with it uncertainty about the future, including the nature of international donor support and the ability of the Afghan state and economy to meet its financing needs.This report tracks three major areas of international spending that have a direct bearing on the daily lives of Afghan people: humanitarian, development and security spending. It also considers the domestic economic outlook and the choices donors face in recalibrating their partnerships and investments to protect and build on hard-won development and security gains made since 2001. 

    PDF icon DevelopInit Afghanistan Beyond 2104.pdf
  • Salah: Civil society recommendations for the NATO Summit 2014, September 2014

    These recommendations reflect civil society concerns over the imminent withdrawal of international combat troops, the restricted capacity of the Afghan security forces, and issues relating to their accountability.  Salah is a consortium of 8 Afghan civil society organisations focused on policy and advocacy for promoting peace and security. 

    PDF icon Afghanistan Peace and Security - SALAH 3.pdf
  • APPRO: Monitoring Women's Security in Transition, September 2014

    This series of studies explores the impact on Afghan women of the ongoing security transition from international security forces to their national counterparts.  In particular it monitors their overall security, mobility and access to public life, access to services (Health and Education), access to justice and the themes of violence against women and women & current affairs.The research has been conducted by APPRO - Afghanistan Public Policy Research Organisation - and has been commissioned by AWN - the Afghan Women's Network - and Cordaid for their outreach and advocacy uses. A baseline study conducted in June 2013 was followed by a Cycle 2 report in October 2013 and a Cycle 3 report in June 2014. 

    PDF icon AWN Monitoring_Womens_Security_in_Transition_June_2013_baseline_report.pdf, PDF icon AWN Monitoring_Womens_Security_in_Transition_Cycle 2 report Oct 2013.pdf, PDF icon AWN Monitoring_Womens_Security_in_Transition_Cycle 3 report Jun 2014.pdf
  • International Crisis Group: Afghanistan's Insurgency after the Transition, May 2014

    In their latest report on Afghanistan, the International Crisis Group examine the security challenges in light of the international troop withdrawal, analysing in detail the situation in the four provinces of Faryab, Kunar, Paktia and Kandahar.  Findings and recommendations include concerns that donor's current plans to support the Afghan security forces are insufficient but that a post-transition government may have better prospects for reviving peace talks. 

    PDF icon Intl Crisis Gp-afghanistan-s-insurgency-after-the-transition.pdf
  • IRC: What next for Afghanistan? April 2014

    IRC conducted indepth interviews with over 100 of their national Afghan staff to understand their perspectives, and those of the communities in which they live and work, regarding current and anticipated security and development issues.  Their comments form the basis of this detailed study of Afghanistan in 2014, as international troops withdraw, a new government is elected and as the international community takes stock of progress to date.  The report also provides practical recommendations for the international community, including: Make a long-term commitment to the people of Afghanistan; break the cycle of displacement and continue to offer refuge, resettlement and asylum to vulnerable Afghans who cannot yet safely return home; use limited resources effectively by coordinating and sharing information so that assistance is more targeted and reaches all in need. 

    PDF icon IRC What next for Afghanistan.pdf
  • Chatham House: Electoral Turnout in Afghanistan, April 2014

    Reporting on the unexpectedly high turnout by Afghans for the presidential and provincial elections, Chatham House's briefing paper paints a positive picture of the enthusiasm for democracy.  However they comment that this enthusiam is not necessarily extended to any particular candidate.  The figures also demonstrate defiance in the face of Taliban security threats and activities.  Finally, the report presents suggested roles for the international community to support a peaceful transfer of power. 

    PDF icon Chatham House Electoral Turnout Apr14.pdf
  • Islamic Relief: Afghanistan in Limbo, March 2014

    Islamic Relief's report raises their concerns that significant aid cuts - both those realised recently and anticipated - could derail the progress made in Afghanistan in the last decade.  The report points out that aid has fallen from $894 million in 2011 to $508 million in 2013, and less than a fifth of the UN’s humanitarian plan for 2014 has been funded so far. The UK’s contribution to the international aid effort has dropped from an average of $296m per year from 2009 to 2011, to a pledged $178m a year from 2012 to 2017.Islamic Relief argues that rather than cut aid, the international community should maintain aid levels and concentrate on improving aid effectiveness.

    PDF icon Afghanistan in Limbo Islamic Relief Mar14.pdf
  • Chatham House: Looking beyond 2014 - Elections in Afghanistan's evolving political context, February 2014

    Chatham House's briefing paper warns of the need for Afghans to look beyond the importance of selecting a successor to President Hamid Karzai, and to focus on issues such as the election process itself and the possible changes in patronage networks as politicians reposition themselves. 

    PDF icon Chatham House AfghanistanBeyond2014 Feb14.pdf
  • Chatham House: Anticipating and responding to fraud in the 2014 Afghan elections, February 2014

    Chatham House's briefing paper addresses the currently unanswered questions of what election outcomes and processes will be 'credible' and 'legitimate', given the strong likelihood of election fraud.  Afghans will have different perceptions and expectations of legitimacy to the international community, with the latter likely to face difficult decisions concerning possible intervention and support of outcomes.  

    PDF icon Chatham House AfghanistanElections Feb14.pdf
  • Afghanistan Watch: Women in 2014 Transition, February 2014

    Afghanistan Watch's report summarises the findings of a series of regional conferences held in late 2013 to explore and encourage the political mobilization of Afghan women. Four main issues were discussed during the conferences: reconciliation with the Taliban, the presidential election, security and economic transitions. The report is based on the views of around 600 women who participated in seven regional conferences. Recommendations include requests to the government and the Independent Election Commission to establish initiatives encouraging the participation of women in the election; civil society organizations should exert pressure on the presidential candidates and candidates for the provincial councils to prioritize issues of women in their platforms and policies and to provide clear programs for improving the conditions of women; women's rights activists should establishing networks with women in leadership and policy-making positions to tackle issues concering reconciliation with the Taliban.

    PDF icon Women_in_2014_Transition_English.pdf
  • BAAG: Transition and Non-Government Organizations in Afghanistan, January 2014

    BAAG, in partnership with ENNA (European Network of NGOs in Afghanistan) and APPRO (Afghanistan Public Policy Research Organization), surveyed various NGOs operating in Afghanistan in mid-late 2013.  This research reveals their concerns and recommendations on the various scenarios which could result from the security, political and financial transitions of 2014.  Whilst all surveyed NGOs are firmly committed to continuing their programmes in Afghanistan, there are various complex issues they and their donors must address. 

    PDF icon NGOs in Transition.pdf
  • BAAG: Sustainable Engagement to 2014 & beyond, November 2013

    BAAG and Chatham House convened a panel of experts on Afghanistan to consider various scenarios the country may face in 2014 and beyond.  Topics included the presidential election process, improving governance, and the role of civil society.  Overall, the panel felt a middle ground, cautiously optimistic scenario was most likely, and discussions indicated the increasingly loud voice of a nation who are demanding progress from their government.  

    PDF icon BAAG Chatham House Sustainable Engagement Nov 13.pdf
  • US Department of Defense: Report on Progress toward Security & Stability in Afghanistan, November 2013

    With Afghan security forces responsible for the majority of security operations (95% of conventional operations and 98%  of special operations by time of reporting), this US report provides an optimistic picture of their abilities and the future security of the country.Compare this to the civilian casualty reports of 2013 and you'll see that this year proved to be the bloodiest since UNAMA started recording civilian casualties - calling into question the abilities of the ANSF and the strength of the insurgency.  

    PDF icon US DoD Report Progress Security and Stability Nov13.pdf
  • ENNA: Letter to NATO Secretary General, October 2013

    ENNA - the European Network of NGOs in Afghanistan, of which BAAG is a member - submitted a letter on behalf of its members to Anders Fogh Rasmussen ahead of NATO’s Defence Ministers’ Meeting on the 22-23 October 2013.  The letter called upon NATO to uphold women's rights and participation in matters of Afghan security and peace building, along with requests for improved mechanisms to hold the Afghan National Security Forces accountable for their actions.  ENNA and BAAG members also forwarded the letter to Defense Ministers in their own governments.  Read the full letter here.  

    PDF icon ENNA to NATO Oct.2013.pdf
  • NATO: Secretary General's response to ENNA letter, October 2013

    NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen responded positively to the letter submitted by ENNA - the European Network of NGOs in Afghanistan, of which BAAG is a member - ahead of NATO’s Defence Ministers’ Meeting on the 22-23 October 2013.  NATO's commitment to ensuring Afghan National Security Forces uphold women's rights and participate in security is explained, as is their commitment to the elimination of civilian casualties and transparent accountability mechanisms in cases of these.  Read the full letter here. 

    PDF icon 20131029 NATO response to ENNA letter.pdf

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